GV15 Build

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Huntsabunch
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GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:41 pm

Okay, I am officially starting a build thread with this post. I have gained much knowledge in the past from forums and youtube videos and have already gotten a lot of help from this one. The least I can do is to post my stumblings in the hope that it will keep some other poor rookie from making the same mistake. (Not to mention getting a lot of great input from experienced members) I am a life long DIY'er and should be able to pull this off but have been at it long enough to know that (1) there is always a better way, and (2) there is always something you don't know about, that you absolutely should not do. I sure hope everyone will speak up about both.
I am pretty familiar with boats in general, having fitted out a 38' Chris Craft, Sport Commander which i chartered (part time) out of Little River, SC for diving and fishing. I later picked up an older model Post 42' which I ran out of Calabash, NC. I've also owned or operated the usual plethora of run abouts, ski and bass boats, etc. on the many beautiful lakes and waterways available in the Carolinas.
I am also no stranger to building things, being a machinist by hobby and a home builder by profession. Both for the past 30 years or so. So combining the two seems like a very natural thing. We'll see.
I chose the GV15 for a lot of reasons but the final straw was the build by wegcagle. What a neat little boat. And a great layout as well. I probably shouldn't copy all his ideas but so far I don't see much I would change. I was really impressed and his video got me motivated enough to get started.
I also have a local friend who built a couple boats and continues to modify them to suit his current mood. His member handle was "cedarrock" and it is comforting to know I have an experienced builder near by to help with the beer drinking and head scratching. He is actually the one who told me about stitch and glue, and the website in the first place.

So far, I have purchased most of my materials, cleaned out the garage, built my strong back, and cut out all of the patterns that I know I will need. My garage floor slopes so, instead of raising one end of the strong back a couple inches to level it, i raised the whole thing 14". I added some 2x4's to make a flat, convenient place to cut plywood. I will later remove them and use them to fly the frames.
Living on the coast, I was able to purchase both Okume or Maranti plywood localy. Turns out the plywood vendor also carried System Three and Silvertip. Got a great deal on both and am starting the build under budget. (That's if you don't count the several new tools I picked up to make things a little easier)
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My posse is coming down this weekend for our annual venison sausage grinding so I won't make any progress until next week but will post regularly or when I hit a snag (which is probably the same thing as regularly). Thanks, in advance, to everyone for letting me be a part of your hobby.

Ken



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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Eric1 » Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:27 am

Good luck with your build!

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by BB Sig » Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:01 am

Tools never count towards the budget unless you can't use them on another project! :wink: I'm sure that won't ever happen.

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:43 am

Okay, so here is my first question. Once I am ready to lay the bottom planks on the frames, do I first stitch it together all the way to the bow before laying it on the jig? Or do i stitch the keel seam and then bend the plywood around the bow form pattern, stitching as I go? Seems like the correct sequence is to stitch the bottoms completely, anchor them to the transom with a few screws, then work it down onto the frames. Following this would be to do something similar with the side panels. Also, should the screws in the transom be considered structural and remain in place? if so, is there and advantage to brass over SS? What should I be watching out for as I attempt this opperation?
Thanks
Ken

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by cape man » Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:01 am

Also, should the screws in the transom be considered structural and remain in place? if so, is there and advantage to brass over SS?
The only screws (or bolts) that should be permanent are those needed to attach hardware after the hull is complete. Any holes in the wood for screws you use to hold things together while gluing should be filled with epoxy after backing the screws out. If you do use screws to attach things permanently, over drill the holes by at least 2X, fill with epoxy mixed with wood flour, and then redrill for the screws. All screws should be in epoxy, and not touching wood. Stainless is the way to go. You can also tip the screws with 3M 5200 before installing to make sure they don't back out under their own. For holding things together while stitching and gluing I use cheap dry wall screws that are easy to drive in and back out.

Don't have the plans for the GV15, but most of the long panels for the bottom and sides are butt blocked together using one piece of ply on the inside, or fiberglass on both sides.

Wegcagle's build is a great one to copy, and I'm sure he would be proud of anything you duplicate.
The world always seems brighter when you've just made something that wasn't there before - Neil Gaiman

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by TomW1 » Mon Feb 06, 2017 11:53 am

Cape man is right no permanent screws in the hull. Dry wall screws to hold things in place work well. Don't even need to drive them all the way in. Fill the holes with some epoxy at some point before glassing.
Restored Mirror Dingy, Bought OD18 built by CL, Westlawn School of Yacht Desghn courses.

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Mon Feb 06, 2017 3:00 pm

Thanks guys. Got it. No permanent screws. I'll work out the stitching. Can't be too tough and it's not like I can't regroup and start over. I've already spliced together all of the stringers, side, and bottom panels. No problem there. Just seemed like the stitching worked a little different when building on a jig as opposed to sharpie style.

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Feb 09, 2017 4:39 pm

Thinking ahead about layout. I understand that the design CG is 42% of the waterline, measured from the stern (is that right?). My first question, is that for the hull only, or with the recommended HP outboard? Secondly, is the goal to load the boat in such a way that the CG remains at 42%? I'd like to incorporate a built i fuel tank. A weight that will vary from 10 to 100 lbs. as fuel is used. Should it be positioned as close as possible to the CG to minimize movement of the CG from fuel burn or am I over thinking it? Can I put it in the bow without creating a submarine?
Any advice would be appreciated.
Ken

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Sat Feb 11, 2017 8:12 pm

Update:
So far the most difficult problem I have encountered is getting pictures to upload to my gallery (lol). I got all the frames mounted on the jig and the stringers in place. It went pretty well. Toughest part was not having a second pair of hands to help hold things in place. I'm discovering that boat building is a 2 (or 3) man job.
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I pulled a center line string to be sure I had everything where it was supposed to be as well as an aid to the "one man" positioning of the frames.
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With the frames in place I was feeling pretty good until I laid the stringers in the notches and saw that they fit everywhere except at the transom, where they were 1 1/4" too high. turns out the transom was 1 1/4" too low. I must have pulled a dimension off another frame while I was laying out and cut it wrong. Luckily I had enough plywood to cut another.
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I really wasn't sure how to stitch the bottom and side panels together prior to install. I ended up stitching the bottoms together up to the point they started to curve. I threw these over the frames and moved them back and forth, to and fro, for about an hour without ever being really satisfied. I went ahead and attached the side panels and slowly tightened things up a little at a time until it all came together.
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I was really pleased with the way seams came together. Truly a testament to the accuracy of the plans. I had to use a couple of screws to at anchor points and to prevent a hump, just aft of frame 1.
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With everything in place and square, I tabbed the joints as near as possible to the stitches and called it a day. Tomorrow I should be able to tape the seams get ready for the MAJOR task of glassing the entire hull.
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These days I spend most of my time in the office or checking job sites. Actually working "hands on" has reminded me of a few rules I have failed to observe to a large extent. For the benefit of the newbies who might read this post, I will mention a couple here.
1. The old tried and true rule of "measure twice, cut once. This can't be overstated. Especially when the marine plywood you are cutting probably comes from a long way away and costs a lot more that regular plywood.
2. If you make a mark that is incorrect or not needed, take the time to erase it or scribble it out. If you don't, the next time you see it, it will probably be right beside your saw blade.
3. Many of the parts you will be cutting look similar. I found it helpful to fold my drawing so that the only detail I could see was the one I was working on. Even with this, I still cut the transom wrong and had to make another.
4. A plumber marks once, a carpenter marks twice, and a damn fool just keeps on marking.This is one of my favorites and anyone who has done much woodworking is smiling as you read it. We have all tried to improve a pencil mark and ended up with a black spot the size of our little finger. Be precise, be deliberate, sharpen your pencil and you might not fall prey to the cumulative error. :)

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Sun Feb 12, 2017 12:45 am

Quick question. Did you decide to tab the panels together and not use wood glue?
Boat looks like it is going together nicely.

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