Sea Kayak Builders?

Boats up to 15' for oars, power or sail. Please include the boat type in your question.
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gpratt
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Sea Kayak Builders?

Post by gpratt » Thu Apr 15, 2004 9:39 am

Are there any other Orca builders out there? I've just ordered the plans and I'm sure I'll have lots of questions about kayak setup. I know practically nothing about kayaks and have never paddled one. I've been reading up on them and see there is alot for me to learn.

Get ready Evan when I get the plans the questions will start.



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Evan_Gatehouse
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Post by Evan_Gatehouse » Thu Apr 15, 2004 10:46 am

I don't think anybody else has started - its a very new design. If you have never paddled a sea kayak see what your local library has to offer on the subject. John Down and Matt Broze are good authors to look for but there are others. The plans are quite straightforward since kayaks are not complex boats! Have fun.
designer: FB11/GV10,11,13/ HMD18/
SK17,MM21/MT24

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jacquesmm
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Post by jacquesmm » Thu Apr 15, 2004 11:30 am

Besides Gary, there is only one other builder. The plans are listed only since last week but I am certain that many more will want to build that very nice looking kayak.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
http://bateau.com

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Johnmon
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Post by Johnmon » Thu Apr 15, 2004 12:18 pm

I've built kayaks and they are not hard and can be very fun. There is a lot of information about paddling, rolling etc. out on the web.
Jack Atchison

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jacquesmm
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Post by jacquesmm » Thu Apr 15, 2004 1:53 pm

3 builders now, another order came in . . . it looks like people like that boat. I like it too and may build one just for fun.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
http://bateau.com

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Jonnas
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Post by Jonnas » Thu Apr 15, 2004 5:08 pm

I built a kayak from Cheasapeake Light Craft last year. It was my first approach to stich & glue building. I've been seakayaking since 10+ years ago, composite (fiberglass and/or carbon) kayaks mostly and the performance of the Cheasapeake got me very impressed. The building itself was very simple, the plans were very detailed.

I'm commited on building my Caravelle sail boat now, and for what I've seen so far of bateau plans and designs, surely the orca will be easy to build, and the plans will be clear and very helpfull. Also this forum should be your first priority on looking for help. You won't be disappointed. Although it's the first Kayak from bateau (isn't it?) stich & glue methods apply the same way.

I'm trully impressed with the Orca's design. Should be a fast but stable kayak, suitable for beginners and experts alike. Also good cargo capacity, important for expedition purposes. My sincere congratulations to the designer. Before a larger sail boat I might build one (or two) for my kids.
Humm .... got to build my Caravelle first! :P

Best regards.
JG

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jacquesmm
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Post by jacquesmm » Thu Apr 15, 2004 5:50 pm

Yes, the Orca is the first kayak plan listed at BoatPlans-Online but it is not a beginners design. Evan is an experienced sea kayaker.
I never designed a sea kayak but my very very first design was a white water kayak. My teacher Pierre Marique always gave a kayak has a first assignement to his students then he made us build and use our first boat. The building instructor was Pierre Roland, a now famous French yacht designer.
Kayaks are fun to build. They go together fast and don't cost too much.
You can car top them and good designs are very seaworthy.
We will soon list specific materials for building kayaks and maybe plans for accessories like double paddles.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
http://bateau.com

Troutlet
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got pics?

Post by Troutlet » Thu Apr 15, 2004 6:50 pm

jacquesmm wrote:I never designed a sea kayak but my very very first design was a white water kayak. My teacher Pierre Marique always gave a kayak has a first assignement to his students then he made us build and use our first boat.
Oh Man, Got any pictures??

We'd love to see a picture or two of your first design :!:
Care to dig around and see if you can find us one? :lol:

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Jonnas
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Post by Jonnas » Thu Apr 15, 2004 11:17 pm

What I meant by "suitable for begginers" was that in my opinion a expedition sea kayak (which I think Orca17 is and not a racing sea kayak) can be padled and enjoyed by first timers, provided they have the proper monitoring (meaning, never padle alone, even more if you're learning) and start in protected waters. It's a type of kayak that will feel confortable, stable and that will give its users confidence to pratice, learn and improve their hability. Then, and only then, it will also be the kayak that will allow for advance use, in more unprotected waters, poor weather and long distances.

I find it more enjoyable paddling my sea kayak in a lake or calm river than the even more stable, but also heavier and wider "river" kayaks for beginners.

Anyway, Orca17 sure looks very good and shouldn't "scare" beginners.

Best regards.
JG

anonymous

Post by anonymous » Fri Apr 16, 2004 6:54 am

It's a nice looking yak. Might be a little bit narrow for a first time paddler.

Look at the study plans: It says it's easy to build but it's recommended a person new to boat building make something else first. Perhaps that something else could be a pirogue that is not as much as an investment in building materials and not as narrow.

Would provide 2 benefits: Experience to boat building and a good feel for what paddling is like.

Or perhaps borrow or rent one of similar size. Not trying to scare anyone. I love paddle sports. Been doing it for 20+ years and I want everyone to experience the joy it's brought me. But it's something you need to "test" before you fully invest. Hey that rymes!

Stability has a lot to do with hull design but also the build of your body, where you carry the most body mass, your paddling technique, the paddle you use, water you paddle in, etc. It's like the big boats: One size does not fit all.

Trying out a yak first will either make you decide to build something else or get you hooked and make you want to build it even more!

Again, not trying to be a wet blanket. Just want everyone to make a informed decision and enjoy. :)

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