fairing tools

Questions about boat repairs with our resins and fiberglass: hull patches, transoms and stringers, foam, rot etc.
User avatar
deedee
Active Poster
Active Poster
Posts: 327
Joined: Fri May 09, 2003 1:00 am
Location: virginia beach ,va.

fairing tools

Post by deedee » Wed Sep 12, 2007 4:03 pm

just wanted to know what everyones thoughts were on the best tools were to fair the large ares on these boats. i am in the middle of fairing my od 18 and am almost out of gas. on top of that my little porter cable 333 ro sander broke again and i'm looking to upgrade. i am not certain that the ro sander is the best choice for these large areas. i was using 40 grit hook and loop pads on the ro sander and it was taking forever with the quickfair. it seemed a little easier with the microlight. just mixing enough to have a fairly thick flood coat and the troweling it on. it seems to sand easier than the quickfair. bootom line is that i need a new tool to fair the large areas on the hull. any ideas?


david e.
va. beach, virginia
od18

User avatar
2stinger
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 4:51 pm
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Post by 2stinger » Wed Sep 12, 2007 4:30 pm

I have been using a Porter Cable 7336 variable speed RO sander for years. I used to install hardwood floors and this was the sander of choice. It will cut fairing compound easily with 80 grit sandpaper but I would not use anything rougher than 100 on the Quik Fair with this sander. The problem is the smaller R/O sanders just don't have the power and will stop spinning in tough spots but they are good for sanding primer. Also a block plain will assist in getting a flat surface. I have made my own but I believe that they sell one here.

Good luck,

Andy

User avatar
Deedaddy
Active Poster
Active Poster
Posts: 414
Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Wilmington, NC

Post by Deedaddy » Wed Sep 12, 2007 5:18 pm

The best and quickes way to get 90% of the way to a faired hull is with a board sander.

Image

Here is a link to the fairing of a ph18....

viewtopic.php?t=11967&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15
The girl spreading fairing compound did this for three years working for a yachts builder.
The sanders are sold here.

User avatar
deedee
Active Poster
Active Poster
Posts: 327
Joined: Fri May 09, 2003 1:00 am
Location: virginia beach ,va.

Post by deedee » Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:01 am

thanks for the replies . i do have a few rigid fairing boards but no flexible ones. i thought of making a few out of my scrap 1/4 in. meranti. i am gonna try the fairing board like deedaddy said but the power tool will be ringing in my head.


thanks again
david e.
va. beach, virginia
od18

TomW
Very Active Poster
Very Active Poster
Posts: 10123
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:41 am
Location: Smoky Mts of NC

Post by TomW » Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:10 am

David you really can't fair large flat areas with a RO, you need a fairing board. With a RO you tend to develop small dips and bumps even though you think your flat.

Once you get the fairing material on only use the flat boards, it sands very easily with 80 grit.

Tom
Good fishing and red skys at night sailors delight
C17ccx, Mirror Dinghy

User avatar
2stinger
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 4:51 pm
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Post by 2stinger » Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:54 am

Tom is right. When I said block plain I meant board file. That is the only way to get the surface fair. I hold the board file parallel to my chest and sand in 45 degree strokes, this will give the flattest results.
Thank's

Andy

User avatar
deedee
Active Poster
Active Poster
Posts: 327
Joined: Fri May 09, 2003 1:00 am
Location: virginia beach ,va.

Post by deedee » Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:16 pm

just finished 3x3 area with quickfair and i'm gonna sand that with the boards i have. hopefully my confidence will still be intact after the boards get a hold of me. i am already using the microlight so i have two definite colors to recognize the high and low spots.

should i be using a flexible board? or is the rigid board alright? i guess that the flexible board will be better suited to fair curved areas????

thanks again
david e.
va. beach, virginia
od18

User avatar
tech_support
Very Active Poster
Very Active Poster
Posts: 12319
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: Vero Beach, FL
Contact:

Post by tech_support » Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:23 pm

you want a flexible board for the curved parts of the hull. The flat one is really nice for the flat areas of the bottom, the sole, console, or anything else. We use both :)

TomW
Very Active Poster
Very Active Poster
Posts: 10123
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:41 am
Location: Smoky Mts of NC

Post by TomW » Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:37 pm

Look at Deedaddy's picture I believe that is his son-in-law. He is using a flat board going from keel to chine with short strokes as he moves the board down, slightly overlapping the part already sanded area.. I believe this is the second coat of fairing material on the first coat they went from transom to bow. Doing it this way ensures very little chance of high or low spots. You can go to his Builders Power Boats site to see the complete build and explanation.

Tom
Good fishing and red skys at night sailors delight
C17ccx, Mirror Dinghy

anonymous

Post by anonymous » Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:17 pm

just to see if i'm clear on this. you apply or pull the fairing material in one direction . then sand it across the direction that it was applied or on a 45 degree angle to it? how thick do you apply it? just thick enough to cover the weave ?

sorry if this is elementary to some but i have never faired such a large area, and i don't want to settle for the "work boat finish" but at the same time i still need to be sain afterwards!!!


deedee

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests