system three in engine compartment

Questions about boat repairs with our resins and fiberglass: hull patches, transoms and stringers, foam, rot etc.
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bertie
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system three in engine compartment

Post by bertie » Mon Sep 01, 2008 8:50 am

Before I start in on my engine room with epoxy, I have a question regarding the material and temperature. Is there a problem using epoxy for tabbing, bonding parts and general use in the engine room with hot temps in this area. The boat is a 28 Bertram and I am installing diesels. Just want to make sure. Any thoughts?



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Cracker Larry
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Post by Cracker Larry » Mon Sep 01, 2008 9:34 am

No problem.

What year is your Bertram? I used to have a 28, 1969 model.
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bertie
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Post by bertie » Mon Sep 01, 2008 10:16 am

Its a 1978 fbc thanks for the help

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Post by Rick » Mon Sep 01, 2008 12:39 pm

Epoxy can certainly soften in high temps.

Dave Gerr wrote a nice chapter on engine room temps and proper ventilation in his "The Nature of Boats." He wrote that most boats he surveyed were way under-ventilated. If you have enough airflow, you might be able to keep the engine area cool enough so that you don't need to worry about temps and epoxy.

If you don't have access to the formulas for calculating ventilation area for particular engine size(s), I can look it up for you. Just let me know.

Some other folks here have more experience with powerboats with inboard engines (I'm more of a sail guy) than me and can give you better information on the risks of epoxy in engine rooms.

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Post by TomW » Mon Sep 01, 2008 2:33 pm

Epoxy will soften if temps rise to high. I would provide enough ventilation to keep temps under 120-130 for the long term longevity of the epoxy. This is usually provided by the ventilation to the engine and blower fans so like Larry said it should not be a problem but do the calculations and make sure you have enough space between the engine and the walls.

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Post by DAYTRIP » Sun Sep 21, 2008 2:24 pm

Bertie,

I just sold my 73 FBSF and I had used epoxy extensivley in the engine room. Never had any issue. The engines don't generate enough heat to creat an issue in my opinion. What diesels are you going with?

Good luck, Jim

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Post by ks8 » Sun Sep 21, 2008 4:50 pm

I had my rudder head lightly clamped together all summer (wasn't bonded yet. It got to around 112F average for a month. When getting the rudderhead ready to bond, I took off the clamps, which had hardly any pressure on them, and noticed the epoxy seal on the outside surfaces had been slightlyly deformed by the pressure of the clamp, the very light pressure. Interesting. That was MarinEpoxy. The glass weave also slightly telegraphed through, but there was no telegraphing where I had already faired (with fairing compound) and primed it. The deformations are strictly cosmetic and noticeable only when you look for them. The primer will no doubt fill them completely. Some days may have been over 120F.

Keep the compartment well ventilated, as you should, and if you want, you could mount a remote thermometer in there for easy monitoring and peace of mind. :)

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