Banjer Rail Repair

Questions about boat repairs with our resins and fiberglass: hull patches, transoms and stringers, foam, rot etc.
Post Reply
MulletChoker
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Fl

Banjer Rail Repair

Post by MulletChoker » Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:17 pm

I have acquired a Banjer 37 motorsailer that needs repair. There was hurricane damage to the portside toe rail, the rail is about 4 inches high around the deck then raises at the bow to form a 14 inch bulwark. (A north sea trawler-type hull, built in Holland in 1972) The rail is formed by the deck and hull skins with a foam core.
Image
I plan to patch the glass damage by grinding down at the fracture points and building up with epoxy and probably 1708 (?) heavy cloth.
My question is: what is the best way to replace the foam core, the original foam is a dark tan color and very brittle. Is there a suitable 2 part foam that I could pour between the 2 skins once they are repaired? Or would it be best to fit coated marine plywood in the slot. This is similar to a transom repair and I have heard of repair products like Seacast but thought there might be a better method.
The top of the rail will get a cap of fiberglass tape.
Thanks



MulletChoker
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Fl

Re: Banjer Rail Repair

Post by MulletChoker » Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:17 am

Image
Another view.

User avatar
jacquesmm
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 26364
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 1:00 am
Location: Florida USA
Contact:

Re: Banjer Rail Repair

Post by jacquesmm » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:48 am

Happy to see that there are still Banjer's. I know the boat, sailed on one.
Is this the one that was at the Vero municipal marina?

Repair:
You should make certain that you open everything that delaminated.
If the core is good, does not crumble, you can repair it. Otherwise, replace with new clean core like Divynicell or pour our 2 part foam in place (railing only, not for hull repairs).
Ideally, you should build new skins but where the separation is clean, you can inject charged epoxy resin between the skins and core.
In places where the skin is damaged, replace it.
That boat was build with 24 oz. roving and 1.5 oz mat, you can see it.
You can replace with layers of 1708 or thinner in tight corners.

Don't use products like Seacast or pour in place transom stuff, use quality materials, they don't cost more.

Email: I should go to Merrit Island this week to talk to somebody about our Optimist project and on Saturday or Sunday, I often go to Cocoa to ride my bike. I don't mind stopping by to look at your boat.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
http://bateau.com

MulletChoker
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Fl

Re: Banjer Rail Repair

Post by MulletChoker » Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:57 pm

Thanks, that would be great.
What type 2-part foam? the same as we used for flotation in the Nina build?

What is the Optimist project?

User avatar
jacquesmm
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 26364
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 1:00 am
Location: Florida USA
Contact:

Re: Banjer Rail Repair

Post by jacquesmm » Wed Jul 08, 2009 2:14 pm

Foam: yes, that one. Ideally you should use a more dense foam like 4 or 6 lbs but for that part of the boat, our 2lbs is better than what was in there.

Optimists are small boats for kids an we are working on creating a CNC kit for them.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
http://bateau.com

MulletChoker
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Fl

Re: Banjer Rail Repair

Post by MulletChoker » Wed Oct 28, 2009 9:51 pm

Work on the rail is progressing, albeit slowly.
I have another question: The floorboards in the cabin are 1/2" inch teak T&G fastened to 3/4" in plywood. the ply is rotting away but the teak is in good condition. Instead of replacing the 3/4" ply could I use nidacore: epoxy the nida to the underside of the teak floorboards, then lay up some 12 oz cloth on the bottom of the core?
It seems this would eliminate any further rot problems under the floor and make the floorboard sections much lighter.
Any thoughts?

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests