1984 Grady 242 Caribbean Transom Repair (+ other stuff)

Questions about boat repairs with our resins and fiberglass: hull patches, transoms and stringers, foam, rot etc.
Jaysen
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Re: 1984 Grady White 242 Caribbean Transom Repair

Post by Jaysen » Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:46 am

cut your replacement piece to fit
seal the edges and an inch or so and let it harden but not necessarily cure.
abrade the hull where the new piece will be. you need the width of the tape...
put new piece in place with bedding and fillet.
put straight epoxy where you need to put tape... go a bit wider
place tape and wet out. Remember to go a bit wider than the tape.
repeat for each layer of tape you need

You can put straight epoxy to seal the rest of the wood anytime it is convenient.

I'm sure someone will see something I missed in there.

Keep in mind, epoxy mechanical bond isn't anything to sneeze at. I'm sure you will be fine with that you've done. Just remember to abrade the areas you need to put tape on.



IpswichGrady
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Re: 1984 Grady White 242 Caribbean Transom Repair

Post by IpswichGrady » Mon Apr 02, 2018 1:27 pm

Nice thanks!

fallguy1000
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Re: 1984 Grady White 242 Caribbean Transom Repair

Post by fallguy1000 » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:07 am

I spot glue my bulkheads with hotglue. You can do same. You can use a shim if needed and glue tue bh in place. (Presand it for the joins). Some folks tape blocks to the hull for holding if it is wiggly. I clamp the top and gravity does the rest, but decks not on...

If you are using padding; I glue the padding in first with epoxy or adhesive; then spot hotglue bh.

Then I fill voids and trowel in the fillets. I like fast epoxy, but u gotta be quick.

Then I wetout my tapes (csm backed) on a table and take them to the boat on stiff cardboard. Best practice is to prewet join area, but a resin rich mat backed tape is very wet and needs no prewetting and my joins are already tacky from troweling fillet area clean.
My boat build is here -------->

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=62495

IpswichGrady
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Re: 1984 Grady White 242 Caribbean Transom Repair

Post by IpswichGrady » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:47 am

fallguy1000 wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:07 am
If you are using padding; I glue the padding in first with epoxy or adhesive; then spot hotglue bh.

Then I fill voids and trowel in the fillets. I like fast epoxy, but u gotta be quick.
I have read that you don't let the plywood bulkhead sit right on the hull. That by doing so you will develop a "hard spot". Is that why you have padding? to act as a spacer so that the bulkhead doesn't sit right on the hull? And what do people use? maybe a piece of foam insulation? And then I assume you don't need to run the padding the length of the bulkhead, that just a few pieces spaced along the span to keep it off the hull, then apply your fillet? How big a space is needed between the hull and my bulkhead edge?

fallguy1000 wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:07 am
Then I wetout my tapes (csm backed) on a table and take them to the boat on stiff cardboard.
CSM backed?... for my tabbing I purchased 6" 12oz Biax tape.

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Re: 1984 Grady White 242 Caribbean Transom Repair

Post by Jaysen » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:55 am

"padding" is relative. If you look in the how-to there's some nice info there. Basically,
1. put a small spacer between the hull and frame.
2. Tack the frame in with thickened epoxy away from the spacer.
3. Let epoxy harden a bit.
4. remove spacer.
5. fill remaining gap with epoxy.
6. fillet/tape per plan

Alternatively buy the nifty stuff that is created for the purpose from BBC ( I think it is closed cell foam).

Remember that the glue on the frame/hull isn't really the strong part of the joint. It's the tape. But you need the glue to prevent gaps under the tape.

Hope that made sense.

IpswichGrady
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Re: 1984 Grady 242 Caribbean Transom Repair (+ other stuff)

Post by IpswichGrady » Mon Apr 09, 2018 8:20 am

I will be happy when the weather warms up here in New England! Anyway, I did some exploring... cutting away wet plywood. Here are a couple of pictures....
Image
This is the starboard wall of my fuel tank compartment. The wood is very wet. I don't know where the water came from. Maybe from where the fuel fill line meets the deck?

Image
As you can see here after I cut around the whole area and pulled away the piece the plywood is soaked!

If you look at the top picture you will see that there is a layer of wood along the bottom. Actually what that is showing is the layer of biax that was up against the foam with the plywood still sticking to it. I sanded it all off and left the biax there to attach my new piece of plywood. I cleaned up the inside biax all the way down to the bottom of the hull.

Here is how I plan to do it... critiques?
  1. Clean it all up... vacuum and rough up the surface of the biax left behind
  2. put down a couple of foam spacers at the bottom
    • It appeared to me that the wood was pretty much sitting all the way down on the bottom. Is that not correct?
  3. mix up a batch of glue and apply it to the biax left behind and to the new piece
  4. press the pieces together and keep pressure applied by fitting a couple of 2x4s and let set
  5. mix up fillet mix and apply
  6. tab in everything
I have learned that this is all done wet, that the strongest bond is when everything cures together.

Question, how many layers of the biax tabs? I think what I cut out was about 1/4 inch. sound right?

Side comment.. thinking out loud... I may need to go deeper... wet wood leads to more we wood.

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Re: 1984 Grady 242 Caribbean Transom Repair (+ other stuff)

Post by Fuzz » Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:00 pm

I do not own nor have I spent time with a Grady so take this for what it is worth :D
Gradies are famous for having rotten wood in them. Now is the time to find and remove it all. You do not want to get 75% of it now and then have to open her back up in a few years.
If you can take some pictures from a little farther away it might help to better understand your biax/bulkhead question.

IpswichGrady
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Re: 1984 Grady 242 Caribbean Transom Repair (+ other stuff)

Post by IpswichGrady » Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:10 pm

I will snap a few more pics. And I have read that the older Grady's do have rotten wood issues. This boat is actually in pretty good shape... less the wet wood. She was a $500 purchase that I knew would be a project. Im happy to do the work... I like getting my hands dirty and learning new things.

One thing I don't really want to do (if I dont have to) is dig away the foam and then replace it with the expanding foam. Hopefully I won't have to.

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Re: 1984 Grady 242 Caribbean Transom Repair (+ other stuff)

Post by IpswichGrady » Wed Apr 11, 2018 9:20 am

Here are some pics. They were taken at night, under the still shrink wrapped boat, with a light drizzle in the low 40s. Spring needs to show it's face!

I removed the rotten wood but left the back side fiberglass tabbing. I figure I would clean up the tabbing left behind and butt up and glue the new piece of wood to it. The area is not in it's final condition to do the work. Need to let it dry out a little so I can sand it down.

Image

The port side of the same compartment is solid. In this pic you can see how high the fiberglass goes up the bulkhead. On the corners it goes all the way up to the deck.

Image

The condition of the aft bulkhead just before the transom has not been determined. I still need to do some hole drilling to see what kind of wood comes out...

Image

Image

I get my boat was built back in 1984... 34 years ago. But even back then boat builders must have constructed boats with water in mind. Encapsulating the wood with fiberglass resin would have gone a long way as a preventative measure against water intrusion. Unfortunately there is just so far I can go. I do not have a large garage like some of you fortunate builders have.

Finally, can anyone recommend what I should use to clean the bilge? Just some bleach... simple green? I don't want to leave a film that will prevent my new tabs from adhering well. I figure I would do some cleaning since it's supposed to be near 70 tomorrow.. a good day for drying if I clean it up today.

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