Texas LB22

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MadRus
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Post by MadRus » Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:45 am

I don't fillet when I tack the panels together with glass squares. I just soak them out on the table and place them where I want them- just woven cloth, not biaxial. They're then easy to sand off when the time comes- after you've finished the outside seams with biax. Takes about a minute to sand one off with 60 grit on a random orbital sander.



Spokaloo
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Post by Spokaloo » Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:52 am

Rus got to you before I did, and said VERBATIM what I was going to say. Do you have any extra 6oz glass tape? Pretty convenient as you will find a million uses for it.

Im hopefully stitching the sides up today....

E

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Dimitris
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Post by Dimitris » Tue Feb 20, 2007 12:50 pm

Your boat looks like a sea urchin with all these ties :)

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jacquesmm
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Post by jacquesmm » Tue Feb 20, 2007 1:56 pm

It looks good and tight but if it was my boat, I would have left large gaps, almost no screws, no stitches, just a little bit of duct tape while the spot welding cures.
The end product will look nice this way too, no problem, it's just a different way of working.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
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Spokaloo
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Post by Spokaloo » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:31 pm

Jacques Im kinda moving your direction on that, leaving up to 1" gaps at the frames, as it takes a HUGE amount of energy to hold all that camber.

Lookin forward to your progress Doug, I just got diagnosed with pneumonia, then to add insult to injury, broke one of my butt joints while trying to move a panel alone....

E

MadRus
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Post by MadRus » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:35 pm

broke one of my butt joints while trying to move a panel alone....
I hope we're talking about boat anatomy there, not human anatomy. I hope you get better soon.

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stickystuff
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Post by stickystuff » Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:03 pm

Being an old drywall finisher Ifind that useing a 4" drywall knife works great for spreading the thickened epoxy. I have access to scrap poly sheets.1/8" and I mix my thickened epoxy, pour it on a 12 x12" piece of poly and then use the knife to scoop up some and spread it over the seams. You can use the edges of the drywall knife to clean the edges of the seam and not waste any of the fillet material. Saves time and material and relatively fast. Makes it smoother and less to sand off the rough edges. Just a tip.You can work a lot faster to. :wink:
Capt. Ken Owens

A little saw dust, a little glue, and a lot of love, and she will float.

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Post by Dougster » Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:05 pm

Thanks for chiming in guys, I especially appreciate the timely tip about no fillets on the glass tack welds I'm gonna put on underneath the boat. Makes clear sense to me and sounds easy. I'm getting more worried though about the tacky fillets I have on though. Some of it is a week old and still sticky, that's bad. That darn EZ fillet is hard for me to measure and get an accurate mix, and I fear I got it a little short of hardener. I tried sanding a little section and sure enough, it loaded up the sandpaper. However, the fillet seems hard and dry after I sanded it. I painted on a little bit of unthickened epoxy on another 6" section to see if that will kick it off, but I don't know. The epoxy is not soft, but a knife can shave off areas that are paper thin that sagged against the packing tap. However a knife can't dig into it. Thumbnail can't make any impression. It irritates me. A three foot verticle section on the bow is finished with old left over epoxy from my little dinghy learning project. I mixed wood flour to the peanut butter consistency thing and, no problem. That section is dry and hard. What's with this EZ fillet stuff. Temperature is around 60 degrees with 65% humidity. Kinda kicked off but sticky to the touch. I'm not resting easy about it, but it's probably a lot better than pneumonia and broken butt joints :) Heal up Spoke, I need you up front of me on the build.

Got the sticky 'poxy blues Dougster

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Post by Spokaloo » Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:33 am

Not that this is a reccomended practice, but being in the medical field its what we would call a "diagnostic procedure". I have done this before, but the temp circumstances and humidity are different here than there.


Get a 500w shoplight or other infrared heater. Heat one section of one fillet so that its a little too hot to touch for an hour or so. Dont melt your ties and dont start a fire, but generally 140ish degrees is the general area.

You will get one of a few results. Complete cure (yay!), no change ( sand and refillet or at least recoat), intense sagging and running (clean it out of the joint while hot and itll be cake to reglue).

Like I said, not a gougeon brothers technique, but one that you can at least try on one fillet to see what results you get. Plus its something you can do in an after-dinner work session.

E

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Post by Dougster » Wed Feb 21, 2007 6:06 pm

Hey Spoke, maybe I'll try that later on a section. It still is no better: sticky, but pretty darn hard, and today the temp in the shop is close to 80 degrees. Not so good sign. The section I brushed unthickened epoxy over is rock hard from that kicking, but sand it off and you hit the slightly tacky part again. The area I did sand is still dry and hard though, I put a piece of spill from the suspect batch in the car on this warm day. The piece is about the size and thickness of a silver dollar. It lost pretty much of its stickiness but can be bent, like a very stiff piece of leather. I don't relish sanding this, and can't really see how to get it all off. It's in gaps between the panels where no sandpaper can reach and it's way, way too tough to manually scrape out with. I'm beginning to think sand it down pretty smooth to where it's no longer sticky and proceed. That wouldn't be difficult, just a couple hours maybe. Getting it all off is quite another story. I don't see this tack weld outside part of the chine seam as that structural, compared to the outside tape, inside thicker fillet, and inside tape to follow. What do folks think?

I'll fix it one way or the other Dougster

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