GV15 Build

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Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Feb 23, 2017 5:42 pm

jacquesmm wrote:
Thu Feb 23, 2017 4:53 pm
I agree that the glass looks too white. Do you use enough resin?
I think so. I rolled the 6" tape then squeeged it off. The next day I had runs all the way down both sides so it would seem there was plenty of resin. For the 50" I poured the resin onto the cloth and spread it with the paint guide SS told me about. This was where I experienced the white spots that wouldn't wet out. I went back over them with a roller (during the initial application. not after cured) and even poured resin on a couple of them. They are tight to the plywood but wouldn't turn completely translucent like the rest of the material. Some of the white in the picture is where I sanded it a little to much. I went back over that with some more epoxy. If there is a problem, what is the fix?



Fuzz
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:19 pm

I admit I am just guessing without being there but can you tell if the white parts are stuck down well to the plywood? If so can you or have you tried to apply a little resin and see if it goes clear. I do not feel real good about trying to advise you from distance on this. I sure hope Jm or someone else chimes in.

Fuzz
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:20 pm

By the way your glass work looks really nice so this makes me even more puzzled. :doh:

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:15 pm

Fuzz wrote:
Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:20 pm
By the way your glass work looks really nice so this makes me even more puzzled. :doh:
If you are puzzled, just imagine what that makes me! :lol: But, yes, to both questions. The glass appears to be in good contact with the plywood and I have added resin during the initial wetting, after the initial cure, and again after that. The white spots get a little more opaque each time but are still visible. I can generally tell a difference in the bond by tapping on a particular spot. If it is bonded to the subsurface the sound will resonate. If not, it will sound dead. All the places in question on the 12 oz sound good. When I find one that doesn't, whether on the 12 or the 8 oz, I grind it out and fill it. Just can't figure out why some of it wets and some of it doesn't.
Thanks for the posts. It's nice to at least have an opinion. I'm pretty good at "logicaling" my way through things but haven't ever jumped on a glass job of this magnitude before. :doh:

Fuzz
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:42 pm

One thing I did think of is some sort of contamination on the glass. I have seen something like that if the glass got wet and not totally dry before using.
As long as it has a good bond I think you will be ok. If you do cut some out you can fill the low spot with wood/epoxy glue. sometimes if I have a real low spot I use it as the first round for fairing.

joe2700
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by joe2700 » Fri Feb 24, 2017 3:22 pm

Rolling a coat of colloidal silica over the hull would make it appear lighter everywhere than just the pure glass I think. Might explain the general look if not the problem spots.

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Fri Feb 24, 2017 9:22 pm

joe2700 wrote:
Fri Feb 24, 2017 3:22 pm
Rolling a coat of colloidal silica over the hull would make it appear lighter everywhere than just the pure glass I think. Might explain the general look if not the problem spots.
It did lighten it up all over. especially where there was multiple layers of glass. Made the light spots less visible but didn't eliminate them.

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:39 pm

Okay, so building a boat is a pretty challenging project. A very satisfying and fulfilling one, but a challenge none the less. you can ask all the questions and seek all the advice you want but at some point you have to attempt to do whatever it was you were asking questions about. Invariably (30 seconds into the attempt) new questions will arise. The answers to which you didn't know you needed to know until right then. Upon completion of the task you might wonder if it is up to snuff. Is it complete to the point that you can move on to the next step. You might also wonder what kind of score to give your effort. You could post a build thread with pictures and get some good feedback from experienced builders but I am finding that can be a little intimidating as well. If all goes well, it's like posting pics of your kids. All you are really doing is bragging. But if you are really going to get full value from the forum you need to post the bad as well as the good. Could be a little embarrassing. We've all made mistakes or done less than perfect work but that doesn't make it any less disappointing when we (I) do.
I am currently in the process of fairing out the exterior of the hull. After all my research, asking questions, reading posts, watching videos, etc. this was the area that I understood the least. I think the biggest problem was not knowing what a finished job should look like. Should all the weave be completely covered? How far back should I feather the tape edges? Was I really expected to touch every square inch of the bottom and sides with a putty knife and fairing compound? What kind of fairing putty should I use for which area? How thick should I mix it and should I use a different viscosity for different areas? How do I feather it completely out to the glass cloth without cutting into the fibers? Should I have put more epoxy over these areas before I started fairing?
Well, good or bad, right or wrong, here is what I did. If you see something that should have been done differently, needs to be re-done, or didn't need to be done at all, please speak up. It might be too late for me but not for someone reading this post. (I also accept compliments if ever one is warranted. It helps relieve the pain of the forthcoming blunder)
First off, I was not about to enter this battle unprepared. I armed myself with QuickFair, colloidal silica, wood flour, and 1/2 lb of the pre-mixed micro balloons and silica from BB2.

554

I was already using the QuickFair to feather the tape edges with good success so I tried using some to fill the weave. It proved to be a little too stiff and also looked like it was going to cost a fortune to go that way. In the end, I used wood flour to fill the weave in the biax. I actually found it to be pretty easy to work with and not that much harder to sand.

548

I tried to do my experimenting on the bottom since it was going to be the least visible area. You can tell from the pic that there was some serious head scratching going on.

551

I determined that I shoud build out the chines and centerline seam to be able to shape it to my satisfaction. I started this process with compound made from the pre-mix from BB2. I think I would try starting with the wood flour, then finishing up with the balloons.

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547
I built one side, let it cure, and then built the other. The final layer on the centerline seam was applied both sides at once since it had a much shallower angle.

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Getting the framework in place was most important. Small voids will be easy to fill in later and take very little material. I learned from finishing drywall that it's a waste of time trying to get it perfect on the first coat.
I'm posting a few pics of where I ended my morning. I hope they are helpful or constructive in some way, even if it's because it's the wrong way to do something. As usual, comments are appreciated.

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Jeff » Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:05 pm

Huntsabunch, you have put a lot of work into this project and it is starting to show results!! Nice work, Jeff

Fuzz
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Sun Feb 26, 2017 7:07 pm

First off I have been building boats on and off for 30 years or so. I still make mistakes all the time. You want read about some real screw ups see my rebuild thread that’s on going. It could be that I need to ride the short bus or it could be that’s just the way it goes :doh: So do not worry over making a boo-boo here and there it happens to everyone.
If you have large areas of low spots many folks will fill them with more fibreglass. You might as well get some gain from the filler. For me if I have low spots that are not quite that big I fill them with wood flower glue. It is stronger and cheaper than most anything else. For filling the weave and as a first pass lots of folks use the purple mix they sell here. After things are close then QuickFair. Most of the time it gets put on thicker than needed and you just end up sanding most of it off. I think several thin coats works better. Oh and fairing is where the long board is king. Plus you get really buff arms out of the deal :D

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