GV15 Build

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flyingvranch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by flyingvranch » Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:18 pm

Very nice work. This is a quality build.



pee wee
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by pee wee » Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:07 am

Fuzz wrote:
Sun Feb 26, 2017 7:07 pm
Oh and fairing is where the long board is king. Plus you get really buff arms out of the deal :D
This^^

I think a lot of first-time builders try to use random orbit sanders or some other avenue to escape the "torture board" and end up in frustration sanding a hull covered in waves and wondering how they got there and how to achieve flatness. You'll want to use the right length and flexibility board for the portion of the hull you're working, so at least two boards will be needed, and since you're seeking a fair rather than a smooth surface at this stage, use something coarse like 40x. The only material you need to remove is the part that's too high, leave all the rest. Your experience with finishing drywall will be very useful, except a hull isn't all flat!
Boat is looking good so far, thanks for sharing the pictures.
Hank

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:57 am

Thanks for the comments guys. very helpful. I do have a 2" x 12" body sander but must admit that I have relied heavily on a 5" orbital. I am aware that you can't take down just the edge. You have to take down the whole patch or you just create a nice smooth low spot. A friend says he has some long boards I can borrow, but here's what I don't understand. When I tape the chine and the keel it makes those areas higher than the field between them. If I put a layer of fairing compound over the tape it makes it higher still. It seems to me that i would have to raise the entire area between the tape lines the same amount in order for a flat board to make contact over the entire area. Is the goal to have a gradual enough swag between tape lines that it won't show? Is a long board flexible enough to follow the contour but rigid enough to flatten out waves? Is it possible to do a good job with an RA if I am really careful to keep it flat and keep it moving? I'm feeling good about the way things are looking. Angles are looking good and fairing is down to small divots and edges. I'm pretty sure I'll get my feelings hurt when I put a coat of primer on her but it looks and feels good now.

555

Can anyone recommend a buildable primer that can be rolled on and sands pretty well? Or is there another way to get the flaws to show themselves? I've been spoiled by wet sandable automotive primer. Doesn't look like I'll get off that easy here.
Thanks again to everyone for the comments.
Ken

pee wee
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by pee wee » Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:14 am

The Silvertip high-build primer they sell here is excellent: http://boatbuildercentral.com/proddetai ... _primer_qt
It's easy to work with and performs well.

I'll let someone else comment on the fairing questions, but you don't need to add fairing material on top of high spots.
Hank

cvincent
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by cvincent » Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:55 am

When I faired my PH18 hull exterior, I first filled the weave with an epoxy and microballons slurry. Only spread a thin enough coat to fill the weave. Once dried, I lightly sanded. For the second coat I started dealing with the high areas created by the tape along the chines, keel and transom. I used a sheerock taping knife to spread and feather a thicker epoxy microballons mix where the tape transitions to the low areas. I basically dumped a cup of epoxy mix along the tape lines and used the taping knife to pull the resin from high areas to low areas, the resin will remain in low spots and get scraped off of high areas. For the next step I sanded again with a long board. The long board will span the low areas and sand off a light coat of resin on the high areas. Use a pencil to mark any low spots. Fill low spots with epoxy/microballons, make sure the low spots are sanded enough to give the next layer grip. I also washed the hull between every sanding to remove any dust or possible amine blush. At this point I moved on to quick fair using the same process until it was difficult to identify any low spots visually. Next, I primed with Sivertip Yacht primer and sprayed a light guide coat with black spray paint. Next I sanded with long board and any areas that are low will have black spray paint resident. Fill those areas with quick fair and sand again until no low areas are identifiable. Lastly, I rolled two more coats of primer. I will probably do a little more fairing before final painting. Its a pain in the ass process, but the hull is fair and smooth.
Completed D15, Building PH18

TomW1
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by TomW1 » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:14 pm

When fairing always use the long board. Anything else may take off more or create another low spot. Second after 2 or 3 coats use a Guide coat, this can be a fast drying spray paint like Krylon which you keep moving to keep moving to create dots. graphite powder lightly dusted or a specialty spray on paint sold on the internet. Sand after applying. This will show the highs and lows, fill the lows as needed.

Happy fairing. :D
Restored Mirror Dinghy, Bought OD18 built by CL, Westlawn School of Yacht Design courses.

pee wee
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by pee wee » Mon Feb 27, 2017 6:35 pm

I checked around for some information about making and using long boards that might be helpful to you and to anyone who might read this thread, I thought these were the more informative:

http://www.bertram31.com/proj/tips/fairing.htm

http://epoxyworks.com/index.php/special ... r-fairing/

http://www.storerboatplans.com/wp/boat- ... re-boards/

One suggestion in there I'd heard before but forgotten about was to use a notched trowel to spread the fairing mixture in the low areas- when you sand it down you only remove half as much material; then, when it's how you want it you fill in the notches flush to the surface. Less effort and less wasted fairing material. I thought the discussion of getting the right flexibility for the chore was helpful, too.
Hank

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:01 pm

Thank you guys. Very good info. The darkness is beginning to fade and the picture is becoming clearer. I know now why the fairing process isn't fully detailed in the tutorials. If everybody knew the truth about it BB2 would never sell a boat plan. :lol: I had thought about painting the hull with something to bring out the imperfections but was afraid it might interrupt the bond between coats of epoxy based products. I suppose I will end up sanding most of it off anyway.
I'm guessing the sides, transom, deck, and above waterline portion of the bow are the main areas to concentrate on. The bottom is the easiest place to work but the least visible.
I'm kinda far into the fairing process so I think what I might do is go with the posted advice and spray bomb the areas I've been working, hit it with a long board and see where I am. I've spent decades trying to talk customers out of using semi gloss paint in their new homes for this same reason. I'm already having mental mages of a funhouse mirror. :) I'm not really looking for perfection but I do want it to look like I care.
Can't thank you guys enough for taking the time to post your advice and experiences.
Ken

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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Fuzz » Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:14 pm

Just a little info. you are passed that point but I tried the notched trowel deal. It might work if you had a trowel with very fine notches. I used one with small/median sized notches and it did not work out so well. I ended up sanding it all off and starting over. Others might have better luck :doh:

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:04 pm

Fuzz wrote:
Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:14 pm
Just a little info. you are passed that point but I tried the notched trowel deal. It might work if you had a trowel with very fine notches. I used one with small/median sized notches and it did not work out so well. I ended up sanding it all off and starting over. Others might have better luck :doh:
I thought about trying that but, at the time, I hadn't figured out how I was going to fill the weave. I have a couple notched trowels with different size notches but I couldn't imagine trying to drag them across the rough surface created by the weave and I thought that if I had the weave filled I wouldn't need the trowel approach. I just hadn't connected the dots at that point. It sounds like a workable idea if you have a fairly smooth surface to work off of. I might also mention that the big box stores have disposable notched trowels in various sizes (1/4, 1/8, 3/16, etc.) in the flooring section. Some even have small ones that operate on the squeegee principal. Smaller teeth would seem to work best but I don't see why you couldn't grind down the edge to make the teeth any size you wanted. Some of the disposable ones are plastic and would be easy to modify.
Ken

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