GV15 Build

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Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:47 pm

When I got home from work this evening I decided to throw together a fairing board based on all the good info from the forum. I chose 3/8" ply for the board because that felt like the right amount of flex/stiffness. I went 3" wide because I could get 3 pcs out of a 9" sheet of sandpaper. I made it 33" long because my info said not to make it less than 24" and my sandpaper was 11" so 1 sheet exactly covers the board. I glued some cork gasket material to the face to add a little cushion (and because that's what I had to work with). I attached the cork with spray adhesive on both surfaces and the sandpaper with light coat on one surface in hopes I could change the paper without ruining the cork. The handles were cut from wood out of my scrap pile and screwed to the base prior to the cork going on.

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I sprayed the bottom near the transom with some red oxide primer and worked the board up and back a couple times over the area using the technique as I understood it. While my new board and 60 grit paper really removed some material the results were as I suspected. The board made hard contact at the chine and keel and a few places in the middle but, for the most part the center was low because of the extra layers of glass along the edges.

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I can only assume that this means building up the entire middle if the bottom were to be completely flat. I'm not really that worried about the bottom but it's a good place to practice. I picked up a 1/16" notched trowel from Home Depot for $2.79 and as soon as my new batch of micro spheres comes in I'm going to experiment with it on the bottom in hopes I can come up with a plan that will get my sides and topside looking like it should. I hope I can figure it out before I completely destroy my nice clean edges. I guess that's the price you pay when you get the cart before the horse.
Suggestions welcome.
Thanks
Ken



Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:14 am

621

I am closing in on finishing the fairing on the sides and bottom. I was wondering if anyone could recommend some kind of paint I could use to reveal the remaining flaws that won't interfere with the bond between epoxy primer and the hull. I was hoping there was something less expensive than the epoxy primer itself.
I think I have used just about every fairing compound available, including Quick Fair, System Three glass micro spheres, wood flour, the purple stuff sold by BB2, and Total Fair made by Total Boat. Overall, I think i liked the Total Fair best. It stays where you put it and sands well. I wish I could start over knowing what I have learned in the process. I guess that's why BB2 recommends doing a small starter boat first.
I used wood flour and epoxy to fill the weave and was surprised how easy it was to work with. Kind of hard to sand on large flats though. I then started leveling and filling the tape edges and splices. I started with an RO sander but, with some coaxing and recommendations from the forum, soon figured out I was going to have to use a long board to get the waves out. My first attempt was a board 33" x 4" and proved to be a little more that I needed on a boat this size. Next attempt was 22" x 2.5" and seemed to be just right, providing things still look good after painting.
I'm still a little confused about the sequence of events going forward. I understand I am supposed to seal any area faired with micro balloons with epoxy resin. I would think this should be done before priming but when I do prime I'm sure I will find additional areas that need fairing. Do I fair, seal, and prime these areas again? Or will the epoxy primer work as a sealer for the micro balloons?
Maybe I should just ask, "what is the sequence of steps after you have the fairing as good as you can get it by feel?".

Eric1
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Eric1 » Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:22 am

Spray a light guide coat with cheap spray paint, I used a can of blue I had in the shop . Then sand with #220. Any remaining blue speck are lows you need to fill. Tom showed me this trick, It works well. Just keep the can moving and you'll get specks of paint!

Image
The lows really jump out at you.

TomW1
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by TomW1 » Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:25 am

Check out Eric's C21 build he shows a great picture of his guide coat.
Restored Mirror Dinghy, Bought OD18 built by CL, Westlawn School of Yacht Design courses.

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:48 am

Ii have ordered my primer after much research and consternation about which one is the best choice. I hope to get a couple coats on the bottom and sides this weekend and hope, even more, that I won't be too disappointed with the results. Everything feels really good and it was, pretty much, all done with a long board. But there are so many different color patches that it is impossible to know what it will look like when it is all the same color. Wish me luck.
Once I am finally done fairing and priming the outside of the hull I plan to carry it outside and modify my strong back to hold the boat upright. My strong back currently looks like this.

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I plan to remove and modify the cross members so that it will look like this:

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My question is where to place the cross members to avoid hard spots. Should I place them at the frame locations or between the frame locations? If the hull is deformed by the weight being concentrated in one spot when i glass in the stringers and frames, that deformity will be permanently built into the boat. Or do I need to cradle the entire length of the hull like this:

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Any suggestions would be appreciated. I've been warned over and over about hard spots and this seems to be one area, if done improperly, that can't be fixed with a little extra glass and epoxy.

willg
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by willg » Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:29 am

What I and some others have done is to build the future strongback on the hull while it's upside down so that it's level and ready for the boat when the flip is done. It is the aft, planing part of the hull which is most important to get right. On my PH18 I used sections of 2 x 8's with widths trimmed and the long edges angled to match the hull beneath the 4 stringers, then braced them together. In other words, with these stringer supports in place on top of the upside down hull, their tops (the future bottoms) were all level so that this cradle would be level once flipped. There's a great picture of this somewhere on the forum but I don't know where.

When you install the stringers and bulkheads/cross-members in the hull, hard spots will be avoided by placing spacers between these pieces and the hull. That gap will be filled with putty before the glass tape is installed so that their loads will be evenly distributed along their lengths.

Huntsabunch
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Huntsabunch » Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:53 am

I have faired every spot I can find, using just about every method recommended by forum members or that I could figure out on my own. After an initial false start (thinking I could use a RO sander to fair with) used long boards exclusively to flatten the sides and bottom. I got down to 150 grit with the boards then went over the whole thing with 220 on a 4"x10" drywall hand sander. Surprising how many spots were revealed by the 220 grit that weren't apparent after the 150. I vacuumed all surfaces with my shop vac then wiped them twice with denatured alcohol. After some more advice from the forum I decided to go ahead and seal the fairing compound with epoxy before priming. I used the slow cure hardener to give the resin a little more time to level itself. I was concerned about runs and ended up getting it a little thin in a couple of areas. Worse case scenario is I'll have to re-coat a couple areas if it doesn't sand flat. The areas where I got enough epoxy look really good. Here's a pic.

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Recommendations were to sand with 80 or 100 grit before applying the resin to the faired hull. I hope I don't have an adhesion problem since mine had a 220 grit finish on it but I just couldn't see undoing what I had worked so hard to do. Also, I decided to use the System Three epoxy primer and, from what I read, it isn't really a high build type material so having the sub surface as smooth as I could get it seemed like a good idea. I made sure the surface was clear of dust or anything that could interfere with the bond and rolled her on. Today I will sand the resin coat to see if I can get it flat. If so, I'll roll on my first coat of primer and find out what kind of fairer (is that a word?) I am. If not, I'll add some more resin to the light spots and prime tomorrow.
You can see in the picture, at least 4 different kinds of fairing compound. My experience at this point is very limited but so far I like the Quick Fair and the Total Fair (both pre mix) best but there is something to be said for being able to customize a batch for a particular situation and that can only be done with the individual thickeners added to the resin. It again becomes clear why BB2 recommends building small, easy plan before you jump on a full size build. I've learned so much over the last 6 weeks. A second build would be so much easier. Many thanks to all the forum members who have offered their advice and experiences (good and bad). I'm sure I'll need a lot more before I finish.

Eric1
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Eric1 » Sat Mar 18, 2017 12:01 pm

I think it looks great! Wish I was there with my build!!

willg
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by willg » Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:59 pm

That looks real nice from here. You should be proud of that.

Jeff
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Re: GV15 Build

Post by Jeff » Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:18 pm

I agree with the guys, looks great!! Jeff

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