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Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:41 pm
by Country1
I have no problem buying 3 plans for us if we can get it to 23ft and 8'6" wide. I have been in one of these and had a couple of guides that built them but with 5 people it doesn't quite have the room. So for us we need them 23-24 ft and 8'6" beam. They won't be trailers.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:59 pm
by Country1
When could we get the plans on a stretched model. Actually the beam is fine just the length.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:40 pm
by jacquesmm
OK, that is somewhat easier.
I still have to redesign the model, add frames, redo calculations, reinforce panels etc. then draft all that.
I need about 10 hours for the calculations and 20 for the drafting but I must finish a couple other jobs first.
Let's say 2 or 3 weeks.

About the scale: when modeling (= design in 3D) on the computer, we do not use a scale, we design full scale. Later, the drawings are scaled to fit on paper, for printing.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 7:10 pm
by Country1
Yeah I figured these are scaled to 3/8 it looks like.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Sun Jul 22, 2018 9:30 am
by CatfishHunter
the xf20 should easily be able to fish 3 or 4. Several xf20's as well as the similar older microdraft are being used as guide boats in the area. I'm building one for the same purpose.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Sun Jul 22, 2018 11:57 am
by jacquesmm
Country1 wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 7:10 pm
Yeah I figured these are scaled to 3/8 it looks like.
All my paper drawings are to scale even those marked NTS but you should never take dimensions from a paper drawing and scale it up. All the dimensions necessary to build the boat should be on the drawings.
In the old times, you used a table of offsets to redraw the boat full scale on the floor and took dimensions from there. It is called lofting and was a long and difficult process because you had to correct the inaccuracies from lines drawn on paper. I have done it often and have found scaling mistakes up to several inches.
Today, we loft the hull on the computer with great accuracy, 5 decimals of 1" in my case. Or 5 decimals of 1 mm. It is all fair and correct, we do the lofting. If I forgot to show a dimension, post here and I will reply.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:24 pm
by cape_fisherman
Where I live we see many flat bottom skiffs in the 22-24 range. Every now & then I'll see a 26 or a 28. Those are big skiffs...but there is a market.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:35 pm
by Jaysen
Lots of them around here too. The big boys are typically work boats for crabbing or inshore guides. A few of the 24s are family fishing and party boats (Carolina skiff). I bet a quick build that could compete performance and cost would be popular around here.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:47 pm
by jacquesmm
Thanks for the good news. I would hate to put so much work in a design that nobody wants to build.

Re: Extreme 20 question

Posted: Thu Jul 26, 2018 9:18 pm
by BB Sig
jacquesmm wrote:
Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:47 pm
Thanks for the good news. I would hate to put so much work in a design that nobody wants to build.
I don't think you will ever have that problem. Your designs are timeless.