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Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 7:16 pm
by OrangeQuest
Your boat looks great on the water!!! And your write up is awesome!

Need to get the spare tire some place else. From the first picture it looks like it is a few inches from rubbing the ground, one small incline and it will. Can you move it to behind the winch, laying flat?


Again, your boat looks at home on the water!

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:00 pm
by seaslug
Congratulations on a great build and successful launch. The boat is beautiful, and your pictures really showcase the great lines she has, thanks to Jacques once again. I use a segmented 21' graphite pole, and someday when I have an extra $1300 bucks laying around I'll buy a 22' one piece pole for the extra stiffness, and lighter weight. That being said, the segmented poles are really quite good, just very slightly heavier, and a bit more flexible, but very good overall. I don't know if anyone will ship overseas, but you can't go wrong with Carbon Marine, they make a great pole. I think it would be more than $500 for a 19-21' pole though. I recommend no less than a 19' pole, longer if you can afford one. Great write up and pictures, thanks for posting, and happy fishing. Mike

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:09 pm
by VT_Jeff
Boat looks amazing and your splash story is awesome, really stoked for you, congrats!

Jeff

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:03 am
by changeat44
Very nice boat and pictures!

Daniel

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:48 am
by Jacky Chan
Thanks everyone for your comments, and your tips along the way!

If anyone in the UK is thinking of building one of these boats, I can thoroughly recommend a few otters people that I was lucky to encounter that have also been a huge help:
Motor/FF/Electrical: Duncan from Wet Marine Bristol/SW Marine Store Salcombe www.swmarinestore.com He really took me under his wing as a novice in need of a lot of advice!
Poling Platform: Julian from Phoenix(316) Ltd in Plymouth https://phoenix316.com Was an absolute pleasure to work with and really knows his stuff.
Paint etc: All the boys from Force4 in Bristol www.force4.co.uk They were so helpful with all the little details that really add up, steered me clear of some costly mistakes, and generally told me how to build and paint - glad I went with the more expensive paint as it is bombproof!

I also had good experiences with the suppliers I went for - Pecepoxy in Cumbria for the epoxy and East Coast Fibregalss for, you guessed it, the glass.
https://www.pecepoxy.co.uk
https://www.ecfibreglasssupplies.co.uk

Jeff - I will delete the bit about the suppliers if you start shipping to the UK! :wink: :lol:
A special thank you is to Jeff and Jacques for having the genius to create such an exquisite design, and the generosity to make it available for $75! :D

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:50 am
by Jacky Chan
Er that should say "a few other people" not "a few otter people"... though I have heard tales of otter people in certain parts of Devon before :wink:

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:27 am
by Jacky Chan
Just thinking about ways to keep the boat to hand on a far-away beach for, say, a long lunch, or overnight - has anyone ever tried these inflatable rollers?
image005s.jpg
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They seem like a good way to do it without having to anchor it and swim/have an inflatable tender etc. Seems like three is the magic number, and two of them could double as a seat as you hold the tiller. If you could roll the boat above the high-tide mark (we get a lot of tide here) then you could sleep soundly nearby without worrying about anchors slipping, leaving the single malt on the boat etc etc 8)

Now I promise you I havent been drinking, but I also thought about using a replacement handle for a garden fork to hold the boat in position going up the beach like a ratchet, as you move a roller, or take a breather. The idea was to whittle the handle-end so you can stick it up underneath the armpit of the raised motor, held in place with a bungee. Then as you roll up the hill, the sharper end (maybe with a more acute angle cut, in order to dig in) would drag along the sand until you come back a little way, when it would hopefully dig into the sand and hold the boat in position...
IMG_2387.PNG
Then to go back downhill you just take the weight off the stake, lift it, and roll on down till your next roller becomes free.

I'm going to give it a go when the weather next improves, which might be a while - any thoughts in the meantime much appreciated!

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:36 am
by Jacky Chan
Trying that link again:
Beach roller pic.jpg
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Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:25 pm
by Fuzz
They use rollers to put boats up above high tide mark a lot around here. Mostly I see this done with larger boats that are too big for any lift in this area. I did a crane inspection on a 120x40 steel barge last month that was hailed out using rubber rollers, just way bigger than what you show. We have a little tidal action here also :wink:

Re: FS18 on the double!

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:21 pm
by cape man
Depending on how far from shore you would need to anchor to keep it afloat, you might use a loop of rope that feeds through a shackle on the anchor, with a tag attached to the bow, and the other end of the rope secured on shore. That is what I use when beach camping here, allowing me to come ashore and then pull the boat back out to anchor. If I need anything off the boat ("Damn! Where did I leave my sunglasses?"), it is simple task to pull it in and back out.

Here's a video I found of the concept, but the guy has added a separate line to the loop for the anchor.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hxOFQ8t6F0

Another example of the principle, but this guy has added pulleys to it (I don't think you need them).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLzqQwcd1g0

The really nice thing is that once set, you are actually distributing the force of the floating boat onto two points - the anchor and the shore attachment - making the anchor set more secure if the wind or currents pick up. The bow will also turn into the current or wind if it shifts. I use a 200 ft piece of 3/8" poly rope threaded through a stainless shackle on the end of the chain rode which works fine on Cape Sable with a maximum of 4-6 feet of tide. I have been to Weston Super Mare (visited Steve 392 who built a gorgeous FS17 high sheer) and saw the tides. You may need MORE rope for the loop!!!