Question for Richard Woods

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Jeff
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Question for Richard Woods

Post by Jeff » Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:50 am

This question arrived in our inbox earlier today:

"Hello I would like to know the capabilities of the skoota cat. How rough seas can this vessel handle? I would like to use this as an inter island ferry and fishing boat. Thanks."

Jeff



fallguy1000
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Re: Question for Richard Woods

Post by fallguy1000 » Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:23 am

X
Last edited by fallguy1000 on Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
My boat build is here -------->

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=62495

fallguy1000
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Re: Question for Richard Woods

Post by fallguy1000 » Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:25 am

I am not Richard Woods.

But building one of his cats.

Cats are capable in seas near or just exceeding overall beam. The trouble is humans are less capable. The amount if time you spend in such a sea state greatly increases the chances of rogue waves bigger than the beam and capable of capsizing the vessel. Also, humans tend to be unable to eat, drink, etc. in violent weather. This weakens you and makes you vulnerable to going overboard or bashing your head, etc.

Richard has an excellent story on his webpage about being caught in a bad sea state for days really and requiring rescue by the US Navy and losing his boat forever as it drifted toward Asia.

http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/index. ... orm-part-1

I am only answering for Richard because he is on vacation in the Bahamas and he may not see the question.

Also, Richard takes very good account for two other seastate issues with catamarans; they pound if the bdeck is too low (he keeps them higher) and they become unmanageable if the above water draft (windage) is too high. Those two are at war with each other in design mind you. Richard's Skoota series are designed for cruising economy; they are not planing hulls and have the distinct advantage of beachability. And despite them not being planing hulls; the Skoota 32 in the UK achieved speeds of 25mph.

I recommend the plywood builds, if possible. Mine is foam sandwich and quite a bit slower to build, but I think we are looking good for spring 2020 launch. 3 year build which includes my hip replacement

See the link below.
My boat build is here -------->

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=62495

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OrangeQuest
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Re: Question for Richard Woods

Post by OrangeQuest » Mon Feb 18, 2019 10:39 am

What a great story. Thanks for posting it Fallguy. Hope you DO NOT have an adventure like Richard's. 8O

Woods Designs
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Re: Question for Richard Woods

Post by Woods Designs » Tue Feb 19, 2019 1:49 pm

But I am!

Sorry I haven't been active here for months. As Fall guy says we are currently living on board our Skoota 28 powercat in he Bahamas, so internet is sometimes sketchy. It is our third visit here in Skoota. It was built in the PNW and we cruised there for 3 years before trucking it to Texas. And then cruising round the gulf coast to Fl and Bahamas. Over 6000 miles now without any issues. It takes about 5 hours to cross from Fl to Bahamas so we can easily chose our weather leave in daylight and be on the banks by lunchtime. We have done that trip 5 times now in Skoota (13 times in total over the last 16 years)

I actually have several Skoota designs that Jeff sells , Skoota 18, 20, 24 are trailable. Skoota 28, 30, 32, 36 are cruising boats. Jazz 30 is a fishing boat. And then some variants, like the demountable 32 that Fallguy is building, and a ferry/water taxi option on the 36.

So not sure which Skoota you mean?

But there is no reason why a power cat shouldn't be as seaworthy as a sailing catamaran. And I would have no problem sailing one of my 22ft Janus, 24ft Strider, 22ft Wizard etc across to the Bahamas. It is a much shorter trip than crossing the English Channel, in better weather with less shipping. Fuel capacity limits range of course, we carry enough fuel for about 250 miles

You may find this article of interest http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/ ... -cruiser20

Hope that helps!

Richard Woods of Woods Designs

www.sailingcatamarans.com

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