Plumber's grease

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OrangeQuest

Plumber's grease

Post by OrangeQuest » Fri Jul 27, 2018 8:33 am

Anyone use plumber's grease on their boats, tools or sticky issues with moving parts? My very expensive silicone grease supply is at it's end and looking for a cheaper supply. I found DANCO makes two products that are silicone based and look very promising for a cheaper substitute. Says it can be used on rubber and latex seals. All the little moving parts on the throttle, shift/steering cables and anything that needs a grease. Being waterproof and a extreme temperature range sounds like it would work very good for what I need. If it is close to the same stuff it will also be a good grease to protect electrical connections.



piperdown
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Re: Plumber's grease

Post by piperdown » Fri Jul 27, 2018 9:53 am

I use this or equivalent on my vehicles (hinges, rubber trim, moving parts) Permatex 80070 Silicone Spray Lubricant, 10.25 oz. net Aerosol Can from Amazon for about $10.
I use this on electrical connections regardless of whether it will get wet or not (although I make double sure to use it under potential wet conditions) Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease, 3 oz. Tube.

Regular silicon grease or spray does not have the additives in it for good electrical connections which is why you need dielectric silicon grease (or spray, can't recall if I've seen that around).
Eric (aka, piperdown)

"Give an Irishman lager for a month and he's a dead man. An Irishman's stomach is lined with copper, and the beer corrodes it. But whiskey polishes the copper and is the saving of him." --> Mark Twain

OrangeQuest

Re: Plumber's grease

Post by OrangeQuest » Fri Jul 27, 2018 10:24 am

piperdown wrote:
Fri Jul 27, 2018 9:53 am
I use this on electrical connections regardless of whether it will get wet or not (although I make double sure to use it under potential wet conditions) Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease, 3 oz. Tube.

Regular silicon grease or spray does not have the additives in it for good electrical connections which is why you need dielectric silicon grease (or spray, can't recall if I've seen that around).
The stuff I am almost out of is a very thick silicone base grease but is also used as a dielectric grease also. It is called silicone brake caliper grease and dielectric compound. I found it!

https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Ford-Sil ... B000NU7OZG
Many years ago when this stuff came out it was $45.00 retail per tube at a Dealer.

All connection on my fleet of 7 R/C sail boats get it, even the gold plated ones.

piperdown
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Re: Plumber's grease

Post by piperdown » Fri Jul 27, 2018 10:42 am

OrangeQuest wrote:
Fri Jul 27, 2018 10:24 am
piperdown wrote:
Fri Jul 27, 2018 9:53 am
I use this on electrical connections regardless of whether it will get wet or not (although I make double sure to use it under potential wet conditions) Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease, 3 oz. Tube.

Regular silicon grease or spray does not have the additives in it for good electrical connections which is why you need dielectric silicon grease (or spray, can't recall if I've seen that around).
The stuff I am almost out of is a very thick silicone base grease but is also used as a dielectric grease also. It is called silicone brake caliper grease and dielectric compound. I found it!

https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Ford-Sil ... B000NU7OZG
Many years ago when this stuff came out it was $45.00 retail per tube at a Dealer.

All connection on my fleet of 7 R/C sail boats get it, even the gold plated ones.
Caliper silicon grease is just the thick grease without the additives for electrical components. The thick paste dielectric is still silicon based and can be used for just about anything, although it's pricier for what I use it for. I prefer the spray with nozzle attachment for getting into hard to reach places as well as forcing it into hinge points.

If you want some good stuff here's what the auto shop I use has on hand (while I mostly work on my own vehicles there are times I just don't have the time or computer stuff).

https://www.amazon.com/Mission-Automoti ... VB1TMW9PRV
Eric (aka, piperdown)

"Give an Irishman lager for a month and he's a dead man. An Irishman's stomach is lined with copper, and the beer corrodes it. But whiskey polishes the copper and is the saving of him." --> Mark Twain

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