Plywood vs Laminated solid wood

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SP
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Plywood vs Laminated solid wood

Post by SP » Sun Jun 19, 2016 8:53 pm

Instead of using plywood for the rudder and centerboard, would it be OK to use laminated wood (solid wood) to make the blank before cutting out the part and shaping?

The wood would be ripped in strips at the desired thickness of the part and then laminated together to form the blank.

This is for the rudder and centerboard on the VG20

I would also make the floor frames at the same time.

Reason I ask is I don't have any marine plywood at the moment. I can easily get wood locally, but not marine plywood.



Woods Designs
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Re: Plywood vs Laminated solid wood

Post by Woods Designs » Sun Jun 19, 2016 9:35 pm

Yes you can, providing you laminate it from narrow strips to avoid it warping

The big advantage of using plywood is that it is easy to plane the profile shape because of the grain changing with each layer. So if you make solid timber foils you will need to make a template of the foil shape to use as a guide.

Solid wood foils are stronger and usually lighter than plywood. You can get quite fancy with them, mahogany leading and trailing edges are a good idea (even on a ply board) You can use cedar in the less loaded parts to save weight. And contrasting wood colours to make it look pretty of you varnish it

In either case though it is best to glass sheath the foils.

Richard Woods

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Re: Plywood vs Laminated solid wood

Post by SP » Mon Jun 20, 2016 1:45 am

Thank you.

What constitutes narrow?

Can you use strips 3/4" thick?

Blank is about 24"x 28" - 1 1/2" thick

So 3/4" thick 1 1/2" wide 28" long strips laminated together 24" wide, so about 32 strips.

For the shaping I was thinking of doing something like this.

http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/09/how ... /index.htm

I would make a few templates for the variable length cords of the center board. Cut slots and then use the slots to help blend with the grinder/sander.







Woods Designs wrote:Yes you can, providing you laminate it from narrow strips to avoid it warping

The big advantage of using plywood is that it is easy to plane the profile shape because of the grain changing with each layer. So if you make solid timber foils you will need to make a template of the foil shape to use as a guide.

Solid wood foils are stronger and usually lighter than plywood. You can get quite fancy with them, mahogany leading and trailing edges are a good idea (even on a ply board) You can use cedar in the less loaded parts to save weight. And contrasting wood colours to make it look pretty of you varnish it

In either case though it is best to glass sheath the foils.

Richard Woods

Woods Designs
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Re: Plywood vs Laminated solid wood

Post by Woods Designs » Mon Jun 20, 2016 2:39 pm

anything under 2in wide is good, the more laminations the stronger and less likely to warp but more work of course

remember the leading edge and the first 1/3rd of the chord are the most important to get right. The trailing edge can be 1/8in wide. bevel the end 45deg if you get a hum

RW

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