What to do before, then before and then paint?

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OrangeQuest
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What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by OrangeQuest » Wed Jul 11, 2018 3:56 pm

Ok, other than paint from a spray can I have never done much painting, maybe a room or two.

I see they sell all kinds of cleaner and prep kits to use before painting and then I see an "under coat" to protect against water absorption? That can be up to 3 coats? Then prime with 2 to 3 coats and then paint!?

I can understand the prep to get wax, grease and dirt off and chemical wash with scrub pads and then soap and water and look for the water to stick to the surface and not bead up. I get that but do I need an undercoat layer before I prime or do I prime first and what about bilge paint, does it also need a undercoat then primer? I am so confused! :help: :help: :help: :doh: :doh: :?



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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by OrangeQuest » Wed Jul 11, 2018 8:57 pm

Seems the barrier coat is for over gel coat, so that mystery is solved. Next would be primer. Does bilge paint require primer first?

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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by Capt UB » Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:53 am

clean, sand, fair and clean, sand, fair and clean, sand, fair and clean, sand, fair and then primer, sand and more primer....

Like a few asked me, how nice do you want the finish, Show Boat or very nice or work boat? I learned a BIG lesson on fairing the outside of the hull, it is not easy nor is it fun! With that said, when done right (better then work boat) it will blow your mind that you did that!! I'm OK with my finish, could be a lot better, I now know how to do it better, but will use that knowledge on the LM18.

I will not name names, but there are a few who painted their boats, better the work boat and they look better then the store bought boats! AND they built quick and got fish blood on their boats in less then a year.

You do have to fair the glass... blend it in on the edges (seams). How well you do that is what makes the finish.... I like QuickFair from System 3, it's the only product they make I like. Primers, should be high build and maybe best if it's the same maker as the paint. I had a gallon of the S3 Yacht primer, so I used it. You know the paint I'm using...
SRPreSanQtL.png
SRPreSanQtL.png (40.85 KiB) Viewed 110 times
Home built boats, get their personality from the builder... My boat is NUTS!!! FS14, getting wet soon.... Next build; LM18 (Laguna Madre Skiff 18). This is a beautiful designed boat.

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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by Capt UB » Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:55 am

Your bilge, will not see much daylight.... just make sure it coated with epoxy (you can add a pigment).


I'm using without primers.... right over the sanded epoxy....
SRPreSanQtL.png
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Home built boats, get their personality from the builder... My boat is NUTS!!! FS14, getting wet soon.... Next build; LM18 (Laguna Madre Skiff 18). This is a beautiful designed boat.

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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by pee wee » Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:35 am

It helps to do a seal-coat of neat epoxy over things before you start painting. If you use an epoxy primer then you could skip the epoxy seal-coat, but you would need more coats of primer to get a smooth and even surface. If you're not using an epoxy primer I'd do the coat of epoxy first, it will seal the fairing compounds and provide a uniform surface.

For a new build you don't need all those prep and clean products, final sanding and rinse should do it, but primer is a good idea. If you're going to leave the boat in the water you will want to be more careful in selecting a bottom finish, but if you haul it out after each use then any old paint will suffice.

If you've taken pains to carefully fair things smooth, I think it's worth using a hard and shiny paint as it will look and clean better, and hold up longer.
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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by terrulian » Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:08 am

If you've taken pains to carefully fair things smooth, I think it's worth using a hard and shiny paint as it will look and clean better, and hold up longer.
This depends on how the boat will be used. If you have a nice trailer, are careful with fenders, and never beach the boat, then it might be worth it for expensive paint. In my case, I spent an obsessive amount of hours on fairing, primer, paint, and varnish but I did not buy expensive two part topcoat, which is pretty damned pricey, because I knew in advance what kind of abuse my my boat would take in launching and beaching. I was pretty happy with the result on launch day, and on the other hand my vision of the dings and scratches that were in my case inevitable also is something I'm glad I foresaw. I can touch-up or re-paint with relative ease and little expense because the fundamental fairing is good.
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Re: What to do before, then before and then paint?

Post by OrangeQuest » Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:42 pm

pee wee wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:35 am
It helps to do a seal-coat of neat epoxy over things before you start painting. If you use an epoxy primer then you could skip the epoxy seal-coat, but you would need more coats of primer to get a smooth and even surface. If you're not using an epoxy primer I'd do the coat of epoxy first, it will seal the fairing compounds and provide a uniform surface.

For a new build you don't need all those prep and clean products, final sanding and rinse should do it, but primer is a good idea. If you're going to leave the boat in the water you will want to be more careful in selecting a bottom finish, but if you haul it out after each use then any old paint will suffice.

If you've taken pains to carefully fair things smooth, I think it's worth using a hard and shiny paint as it will look and clean better, and hold up longer.
Thanks again Pee Wee for your insights, it is very helpful. If I get bilge paint then I could sand the lockers and the bilge, scrub and wash surfaces. Then just put a few layers of bilge paint. I would like to have the paint in the lockers strong enough for things being stored in them and the paint not rub off. and a work boat finish.
terrulian wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:08 am
If you've taken pains to carefully fair things smooth, I think it's worth using a hard and shiny paint as it will look and clean better, and hold up longer.
This depends on how the boat will be used. If you have a nice trailer, are careful with fenders, and never beach the boat, then it might be worth it for expensive paint. In my case, I spent an obsessive amount of hours on fairing, primer, paint, and varnish but I did not buy expensive two part topcoat, which is pretty damned pricey, because I knew in advance what kind of abuse my boat would take in launching and beaching. I was pretty happy with the result on launch day, and on the other hand my vision of the dings and scratches that were in my case inevitable also is something I'm glad I foresaw. I can touch-up or re-paint with relative ease and little expense because the fundamental fairing is good.
All the fairing will be on the areas you can see without opening something or bending down. I will be realistic about the use of the boat and how things can get dinged up without even trying to hard. I like thought of a hard finish of the two part epoxy paints and if I understand correctly that the primer works with the paint to complete the finish.

I look at it as any other tool I may buy. When it's new it is shiny and looks good but as it is used more and more it starts to show that it has experience and when called upon it will get the job done. Wear spots start showing as to where it is held the most. So good paint job that turns into work boat finish.

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