Flare drain tube - how

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tcason
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Flare drain tube - how

Post by tcason » Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:24 am

installing my 1 1/8" drain tube soon

just need confirmation and have two questions

I drilled 1 1/2" hole and filled solid with epoxy then drill 1 1/8" hole tube fits tight
cut tube 3/16" longer than transom thickness make sure square
use flare tool
epoxy and or caulk in hole

questions
caulk or epoxy? seems caulk would be better since fleible
I thought I read if you heat the brass tube up with tourch and then let cool - it will make the end flare easier TRUE or FALSE or UNEEDED

Appreciate the advice!! :help:
Last edited by tcason on Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.



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Cracker Larry
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by Cracker Larry » Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:08 am

Heat is not needed to flare it, and enough heat to do any good may damage the epoxy. The larger 1 1/4 tube does take a stout wrench to flare it, best is to use an air impact wrench, it makes quick work of it.

Only cut the tube about 3/16" longer than hull thickness. 3/8 is too long and it will probably split when flaring. I've used both 5200 and thickened epoxy to seal it, both work fine.
Completed GF12 X 2, GF16, OD18, FS18, GF5, GF18, CL6
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pee wee
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by pee wee » Mon Nov 11, 2013 10:28 am

I believe what he's referring to about heating the tube would be done off the boat, not in contact with epoxy. I'd call it annealing, not sure if that is the right term for brass or copper. The result is a more malleable metal, but I don't know what other effects it may have for the long term.
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by bigtalljv » Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:02 pm

are you guys using flare tools or is there a DIY method to flare tubes? I need to flare a 5/8 tube to make a little drain where my fuel fills are.

Thanks,
Jason

tcason
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by tcason » Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:39 am

annealing is the correct term see below

seems to be overkill for drain tube based upon response


Annealing, in metallurgy and materials science, is a heat treatment that alters a material to increase its ductility and to make it more workable. It involves heating a material to above its critical temperature, maintaining a suitable temperature, and then cooling. Annealing can induce ductility, soften material, relieve internal stresses, refine the structure by making it homogeneous, and improve cold working properties.

In the cases of copper, steel, silver, and brass, this process is performed by heating the material (generally until glowing) for a while and then slowly letting it cool to room temperature in still air. Copper, silver[1] and brass can be cooled slowly in air, or quickly by quenching in water, unlike ferrous metals, such as steel, which must be cooled slowly to anneal. In this fashion, the metal is softened and prepared for further work—such as shaping, stamping, or forming.

tcason
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by tcason » Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:01 am

Installed my drain tube this weekend with flare tool.

Went smooth - advice do not cut tube longer than 3/16" to flare.
Smeared hole with caulk.
Result looks almost professionsl!

THANKS for advice and confirmation.

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Cracker Larry
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by Cracker Larry » Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:09 am

advice do not cut tube longer than 3/16" to flare.
:wink: :D
Completed GF12 X 2, GF16, OD18, FS18, GF5, GF18, CL6
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Bowmovement
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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by Bowmovement » Sat Dec 07, 2013 8:43 am

"Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteers be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe."

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Re: Flare drain tube - how

Post by pee wee » Sat Dec 07, 2013 9:14 am

I'm an amateur smithy :D no horse shoes- what I do would be called "decorative iron work".

On the one hand it looks like brute work, on the other hand you need to understand the properties of the metal(s) and how it will change with different actions. There's a lot more science to it than I thought there would be, especially when it comes to making tools or working with springs.
Hank

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