Extreme Flats 20

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msimek
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Extreme Flats 20

Post by msimek » Fri Jan 04, 2008 9:46 pm

Thinking about building the Extreme Flats 20. I was looking into buying a new MicroDraft 20 "Henderson Skiff" but don't want to shell out that much cash right now. The new ones he is building are totally composite and cost 29K.

The one thing I am concerned about is the wood in the boat. I am talking to many people and they are all saying that no matter what I do or how I build that boat, I will get rot. They are saying that the plywood will have moisture in it and when it is sandwiched in the fiberglass, the moisture will seep out of the plywood and eventually rot inside. This kinda makes sense to me.

All that being said I have never built a boat and neither have they. I looked all through the previouse posts and couldn't find anything resembling this question, so sorry to bother you with this.

I was wondering if there are plans for the Extreme Flats 20 that tell you how to build it with foam. Sorry if this is a stupid question.

Thanks for the help, and I think you guys do a great job with this Message Board, Very Impressed


I like fishin like I like my women SKINNY!!!!!

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Post by Spokaloo » Fri Jan 04, 2008 9:55 pm

Picture in your head a small microbe. This microbe needs a few things to grow. Heat, light, air, and water. Some things are more important than others.

Heat is always present in boats, because its rare that a boat stays below freezing 100% of the time.

Light is not as available under paint, but its also the least necessary.

Air is a fundamental point for cell metabolism. Air is 99.99% excluded in this type of construction.

Moisture is the other paramount need, as the cell membrane will not stay intact if dry. Moisture is prevented to a large degree (Joel has the numbers) by this, Id say in the 80-90% range as well.

By keeping the moisture and air out of the wood, rot has little chance to develop. A good, thorough job of epoxy coating will prevent rot. Keeping in mind that your friend is probably telling you that "someday" it will happen, intending on that being 30-40 years from now. Take that and turn it around on him. Is a 1968 starcraft really a solid boat, or is the fiberglass getting mushy in places, cracking from stress in others?

These boats are far stronger being of cored construction, and if built well, will not rot. Couple that with ease of repair, and you are looking at a better boat all around.

E

msimek
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Post by msimek » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:06 pm

Thanks so much for writing back, I really needed to get some solid evidence on that. If this boat lasts 10 yrs I would be REALLY happy!!
I am a real anal person and usually overbuild things. I really think I would have alot of fun building this boat. I look forward to chatting with everybody about the project. Thanks again for your input, it is really appreciated!!
Mike
I like fishin like I like my women SKINNY!!!!!

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gk108
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Post by gk108 » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:21 pm

You would have to be conciously trying to rot your boat if it goes in 10 years. A mullet boat built from CDX plywood and painted with latex house paint will last at least 10 years if you paint it every year.

The most important thing is to follow proper procedures when sealing the plywood with epoxy, especially the edges. These will be procedures that you have complete control over and you won't have to depend on the hope that some low paid boat factory worker did it right. :wink:
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Post by TomW » Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:36 am

Mike there are still some fine production boats using wood including Grady White. Like those above me said properly encasing the wood in epoxy and following the production tips and instructions given here and keeping it maintained will make it last as long or longer than a fiberglass boat that is gelcoated.

Tom
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Post by stickystuff » Sat Jan 05, 2008 5:27 am

Mike. Give me a call. I live in Dunnellon. I can give you all the info you need. 489-7914
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Re: Extreme Flats 20

Post by tech_support » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:08 am

msimek wrote: I am talking to many people and they are all saying that no matter what I do or how I build that boat, I will get rot. They are saying that the plywood will have moisture in it and when it is sandwiched in the fiberglass, the moisture will seep out of the plywood and eventually rot inside. This kinda makes sense to me.
IM sorry but those "people" have no idea what they are talking about, their experience must be based on crappy materials in production boat. No offense, but they are just ignorant of epoxy/wood construction :D

The most expensive customer sportfishing boats in the world are built just down the road from us in Stuart Florida. These are all multi million dollar boats, and made from the same materials as our boats (okoume plywood, epoxy, biaxial fiberglass). Theses boats are built to last generations.

See names like:

Rybovich
Merritt
Whiticar
Jim Smith
Gamefisherman

Many of these boats are 30 years old and sell for more than what they were purchased for new.

My best friend's dad built this boat before I was born using epoxy/wood construction. This would have been right near the beginning of the use of epoxy in boat building...

http://adcache.boattraderonline.com/6/1/8/85339918.htm

It will be 40 years old next year and still in service

msimek
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Post by msimek » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:48 am

I can't thank you guys enough for all the replies. I am fired up to get this project under way. I am going to order the plans today I am sure.
Mike
:D :D :D :D :D
I like fishin like I like my women SKINNY!!!!!

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Cracker Larry
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Post by Cracker Larry » Sat Jan 05, 2008 9:39 am

I am a real anal person and usually overbuild things.
I resemble that remark :lol: Don't worry, anal is a good thing in boatbuilding. Rot will not be an issue if you have that attribute. :wink:
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Post by Boomer » Sat Jan 05, 2008 4:31 pm

Shine sort of took the words out of my mouth.

Two words to "Google"

Rybovich
Riva

Try to find some "for sale" ads.

As for the moisture, ask you friends how long it will take your new FG boat to develop osmotic blistering.

I laugh when I think of the cypress or heart pine boats I've fished out of that are of indeterminate age (as in decades), left out all year long, partially submerged most of the year, in the most hostile environment possible, slapped with a coat of porch paint when they "need" it, and they keep on chugging along. And chugging is the operative word here.

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