Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

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TomW
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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by TomW » Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:03 am

The instructions are included in the plans to raise the sheer 6". The Green FS17 has the raised sheer option in the pictures. Steve hasn't launced it yet so no pictures of it in the water yet, but I beleive the black line is his waterline if I remember right. You can also see sort of how to do it in the study plans. It will take more plywood, roughly 3 sheets. Basically a 12" peice 18' long on each side, 6" to glue and 6" for the increase.

Tom


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keithareilly
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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by keithareilly » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:46 am

Tom,

I am liking th FS17 more and more.

But I still don't know how to make a decision on a boat.
Is there a thread or a book that provides information for the very very novice?

I am looking for answers to questions like:
How to determine the minimum distance from water line to top of side for a given chop or wave height.
How to determine how much water depth is needed to run a motor of a particular horse power and boat draft.
How to decide between transome depths?

I guess I don't yet know enough information to make a decision.
I have seen your books on boat making. But what about something on how to choose a boat and options?

Thanks,

Keith

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by MadRus » Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:20 am

Keith,

Those are good questions, but sometimes, in boating, the answers are not what you would expect. For instance, I think that there is one telling response that always comes back to some of those questions, it is based on a loosly defined term, which is based on an antique concept, which is based on two thousand years or more of history... "know thyself". Short shaft or long shaft? Know theyself. Are you the type of skipper to get into a position where your boat will take on a lot of water, or you'll back flood the motor with quick stops or staying out in less than ideal conditions, or pass too close to a ship's wake? Then go longer. High sides or low sides? Know theyself, etc. There's no answer that's going to save your life or make for a pleasant trip other than, it's all on you. Likewise, you might think keeping water out of the cockpit is the best idea, and I'd say, you're right. But I think a lot of skilled pilots might say, you'll never do it in the conditions I fish in, so I have scuppers and a raised sole to allow the water to drain off quickly. Kind of counterintuitive unless you have a lot of experience. So, I guess my point is, it's really all up to you, know the program you're looking to fill, know your waters and your tendencies, and it sounds like you do, build the boat that will be best suited to those variables and then stick to it.

Consider built-in coolers and then transfering your catch back at shore. There's a lot of room on the FS17 to add modified cooler boxes/live wells.

To answer a couple of those questions though, the first one is called freeboard. It's important, but don't forget your boat is like a cork. Also, higher freeboard means more safety from high chop or running waves, maybe more safety for little ones, but it also means greater windage. That means less control when stopped, pulling up traps in a wind and a higher center of gravity.

The boat draft listed is usually without the motor. Long shaft or short shaft, they'll both add the same depth to the draft, the difference is in the height of the transom.

If you do a google search on boat terminology or just keep participating here, you'll gleen a lot of information.

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by woodboat » Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:48 am

I am a marina owner in sparrows point near the key bridge. I have never seen an FS17 in person but from studying the plans and looking at the photos I think it would be an ideal fishing platform for this area. I have a 1973 18 ft Chrysler boat here with similar stats as far as freeboard and beam and have used it since I was a kid. I would not raise the sides and build it as is but probably go long shaft motor and transom. It will be much harder to crab and fish with higher sides and safety increase will be marginal.
Of course this is just my opinion :)
Rob

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by tech_support » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:00 am

I agree, no need to raise the sides.

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by keithareilly » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:30 am

Thanks Shine and Woodboat,

I have been viewing other threads on the boat. Learning interesting stuff.

Mostly, I am very careful. As my intended use for the boat is in rivers with bay traversals, I don't think I will be spending much time in bad conditions. But you never know how things will change on the bay after while your in a remote river for a few hours. I am thinking more about making certain I can get home without making the boat unfit for fishing the rivers, its primary use. Lie you gus say its a set compromises. I am rying to learn what those compromises are and to make the right comprmises.

I have been looking at options on the boat and trying to decide which options are best. I thought I might look for a guide and bone up on what I want to know instead of asking questions that people no doubt have answered a hundred times. I also thought a thread on the sight under before you buy your plans would be a nice place to library the information and provide other educational references to help cut down on the repeat questions.

I had just about ruled out the higher freeboard - thanks for the term.
But I was considering the transom and how I might not have a lot of flexibility in how I position the boat in the waves depending on where I am headed. I dont know if a higher transom translates to higher freeboard at the stern or if it translates to more draft or a combination thereof. Thought I should explore that before making a decision.

Thanks, I am learning about things I didn't know I needed to consider.

I already know we'll be getting water in the boat. It is the nature of fishing and crabbing.
So some sort of drain and pump system is a must.
Any advice on drainage and floation foam configurations will be helpful too!

Keith
Last edited by keithareilly on Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by tech_support » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:37 am

the transom is plenty seaworthy as designed, no need to raise the engine

TomW
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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by TomW » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:51 am

Keith, I didn't give my opinion when I answered your question on the extended sheer, but I also would not raise it. Raising it adds weight up higher and increases your windage as one of the others pointed out. The transom is actually cut down some to take a 20" shaft motor. Flotation will be given in the plans. You will want scuppers for self drainage, here's a selection I like a larger scupper like the 2x6, anything but the ball or 1 1/2. You want at least 2" so they don't clog. http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/2,331.html

One thing you don't want to do is over think your decision. Do a search of FS17 here and see what questions others asked. Go through some of the FS17 builds down in the Builder's section down below and see what others did. Go through the How To's and FAQ's to get as many answers as you can on the build process and there are some explantations of terms and design info.

One of the guy's has already gotten caught in 4' waves and the boat handled very well according to his report. His report is down in the Builer's section.

Let's go over the study plans's a little to help you understand the boat a little more:
DWL is the designed waterline at the draft of 7"
Displacement at DWL is 1365 This is the carrying weight of the boat before reaching the 7" DWL
Let's break the 1365 down a little bit
400 for the boat now 965 1st timers always build a little heavy
150 for a 25hp engine now 845
650 for you, freind gear gas etc.
195 1/2-3/4" to remain self-bailing.

It also says in the write-up that the boats sole is well above the waterline and places the waterline just below the cockpit sole, so there may be a full 1" of self-bailing remaining in the above.

Hope this helps a little. Keep asking the questions till you have your answers. :D

Tom
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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by MadRus » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:53 pm

A couple other points...

When I said "longshaft" above, what I meant was standard shaft. There are standard (long)- 20"ish, short- 15"ish and extra long shaft- 25"ish. Jacques boats are usually designed with the 20" shaft length specified. You then cut down for a 15" or I guess redesign the transom for a long shaft.

Here's an excellent page about this at onlineoutboards.

http://www.onlineoutboards.com/Help.htm ... aft-Length

You can see that every motor will be a little different in it's shaft length. The best thing to do is get the motor or a measurement off the motor you're going to be using before cutting down the transom mounting cutout. That way, you can cut it to exactly the right recommended height for your motor- according to the manufacturer's specs for best performance. You want the anticavitaion plate about .5" - 1" below the transom centerline usually. And that's around the middle trim setting.

-Dave

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Re: Fishing Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Post by TomW » Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:46 pm

Just for reference NMMA have set standard motor shaft length's for motors 25HP and over, not sure when they were set. So Jacques uses those standards for his motorwell standards now. If a used motor is contemplated then use Dave's info and recommendation, but I wouldn't worry about it to much as there are usually 4/5 holes allowing 2-2 1/2" of adjustment. The big thing is to drill the holes so you can adjust the motor with it sitting on the transom so you can adjust it up.

It is a little early to also talk about where the anticavitation plate needs to go. When we propped Driftwood we ended up with it 1 1/2 inches(2 holes up) above the low point of the transom. Each engine will be different and each prop will be different for each boat. Cracker Larry also ended up with his Acp 2 holes up on his OD18 as I recall when we propped him a year ago. Kurt on Driftwood has a 13" Turbo prop with cupping, Larry has a 17" Yamaha prop with little cupping.

Tom
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