Starting GF14 Construction Questions

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alegath
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Starting GF14 Construction Questions

Post by alegath » Sun Mar 07, 2004 3:29 pm

I am ready to start my GF14 but I have a few questions. This is my 1st boatbuilding experience so I will probably have a lot of "dumb" questions, I'm either too dense to get from the plans or haven't seen in other threads. I have read a lot of these posts & will follow advice re: squeeges, cualk tubes, amount of epoxy, etc.
1- Do the Transoms go inside the hull & bottom or are they edge to edge like the sides & bottom?
2- I have a bunch of 1X1 pine left from another project. Is this OK for the cleats under the seats or should I use a hardwood like mahogany or poplar?
3- I have a mahagony 1X6 to rip down for the 1X1 runners, should they be: A- nominal 1" (3/4 X 3/4), B- should I get some 5/4 stock & make them a full 1", or C- should I make 1 side the full 1" & leave the other 3/4? if I use option C should they be epoxied with the 1" side wide or deep?
Any Other 1st time pitfalls/advice is welcome. It's 50 deg here so I know to watch the drying time, how low is too low a temp to epoxy?



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couple answers

Post by Troutlet » Sun Mar 07, 2004 5:09 pm

Hi Alegath, welcome to Amateur Boatbuiding. I'm building an OD16 and can relate to alot of what you asking. Having not built a boat before everyone on this forum has been VERY helpful and I encourage you to post pictures and questions as often as you have them.

The details on the plans vary from boat to boat and Jacques has the final say so on what's what.
Usually the transom rests on the keel (just a little) and fits inside the other panels.
The dimensions of cleats do not have to be exact they just have to be there. I'd use the pine to keep from ripping wood all day but pine will soak up more epoxy, it will help to sand it first.

Temperatures- if you do a search in this forum for epoxy temperature you will get a "boat load" to look at. If you are using System Three epoxy, it will have a hardener speed. Each hardener speed has its own range of temperatures to work in. I think 70 degrees is perfect. If you are working in an unheated shop or outside you can heat just the area that you are working with and keep the epoxy indoors to keep from getting to cold.
That's my 2 cents worth, hope it helps.

Chris

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Post by alegath » Sun Mar 07, 2004 5:23 pm

I probably should have noted I am working in an unheated garage, & ordered the standard kit not the system 3. I could put a propane heater in the garage (no electric, use cordless tools & an inverter for lights & gernerator for air comp. & sander when I get that far) but I thought the fumes were flammable, & I can't run a propane heater when I am not there. It's been in the low 50's all week & it's supposed to snow tonight, but the plywood won't be in until Thur so I won't start the layout until Friday night. Hopefully it will start warming up soon, normal for mid late March is mid 50's 60's (Easton, PA)

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heat

Post by Troutlet » Sun Mar 07, 2004 5:35 pm

The System Three and E-Poxy are reportedly the same basic epoxy. If it had been available when I purchased, I'd have bought it.

On the heat- I work in a tent garage but run power cords to it and get the bulk of heat from light bulbs. You can get the heat bulbs at any Walmart for about $3. I've also used propane with no problems, I do not think that the fumes are flammable but you need to have good ventilation. Propane fumes might leave a residue on your boat and we don't want that.

Whatever heat source you can use, you can cover your project with clear plastic and put your heat in the enclosed tent to "cook the epoxy". That's what I do and I've successfully gone from outside temps of 40 to inside temps of 70. If it gets to cold and you apply the epoxy anyway there is no harm it just might take a couple days to cure.

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Post by wobwork » Sun Mar 07, 2004 7:24 pm

ive almost got my gf12 done. warm temps will help speed things along if at all possible the cook tent sounds like that might be best for you. ive had a gas furnace running all winter the warmer the better to make epoxy cure fast. also the 1x1 for runners and cleats is fine. i would not go with to hard a wood for the bottom or it will be a little tuffer to bend it i ripped 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 pine for mine. smillinmatt has a site with pics that are very helpfull to check out along the way of pretty much the same boat (12 vs 14 ft) good luck with the boat

rob

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Post by AdamG » Sun Mar 07, 2004 7:55 pm

I'm the third GF12 builder...I think. Smilin was first, I got the plans second I think, but Wob got em right after and his boat will be ready a few weeks before mine will.

Remeber, the plans give you a lot of leeway. As long as you do the basics, most of which is use the right materials and don't skimp on epoxy when using the fiberglass, you should be ok. The details, I've learned, are not all that important.

I used 1x1 poplar for some of my cleats, sloaked in epoxy. Poplar flat out doesn't bend, so I sanded the ends curved some where it neeed curvature at the bow, and used lots of glue. For the rest of the cleats, I used top grade 1x2 pine, you know the kind that is really about 3/4" x 1 5/8". Just soaked it good also. It has an even bigger cross section than the 1x1, so I figure it will be allright. The cleats aren't really load bearing members, but more additional surface area to glue to.

Treat the transoms like the frames. You will have to drill drywall screws through the thinner sides into the edges of the thicker transoms, so naturally, the transoms go inside the edge of the bow and stern of the sides. Otherwise, you would be trying to drill into the front and back edges of the 1/4" side ply, an impossible task.

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Post by alegath » Sun Mar 07, 2004 8:06 pm

I actually have some 1X6 mahogany that I was planning to use for the runners, scribing along the bottom so it doesn't have to be bent, but I wasn't sure if it needs to be the full 1".
I also am not sure about the biax tape on the inside, should there be a clearance cut in the bottom edge of the seat frames so the tape can be 1 piece from bow to stern, or do you you use 3 pieces of tape up each side of the chine? The tutorials suggest this but it doesn't say anything about it in the building notes.
I would like to thank everyone for the help so far, I'm sure I will need more in the weeks to come!!!

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Post by Boomer » Sun Mar 07, 2004 9:05 pm

Well, I can help out a here a little. Jacques answered this on antoher thread. The dimensions for the the runners are nominal, but it doesn't make a lot of difference one way or the other.

As far as the cleats, the pine should be fine. You'll class in the seats.

Do you have have anything to do with Lafayette Community College?

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Post by alegath » Sun Mar 07, 2004 9:22 pm

I work for the City (PD) but I do have a lot of contacts at Lafayette College, both in the civil engineering & public saftey depts. In 2 years I will be retiring from the City & moving to the Ocala area, better weather & boating!!! I am building this boat primarily for use on the Rainbow, I'll be taking to FL in the fall.

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Post by AdamG » Sun Mar 07, 2004 10:19 pm

Forgot to add this: Those halogen worklights are incredibly useful. They provide a ton of heat around the bulb. The light is so bright, it warms what it shines on some as well, and you have good working light too. i bought a couple for about $15 apiece, and they really helped me work through the winter. Every night when I quit, I would aim the lamps at the wet epoxy areas, and they helped warm it to cure it faster.

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